Archive for March, 2007

Own A Fun Loving, Loveable Beautiful Old English Sheepdog

By Ruth Bird

The Old English Sheepdog comes to us from the west of England. It belongs to a working breed of dogs. This breed was bred because there was a need for a strong dog that was capable of fending off the wolves and protecting the herds. By the middle of the nineteenth century these Sheepdogs were used to herd the flocks to the market. Apparently working breed of dogs did not get taxed, but they had to have their tails docked to prove it. This practice continues in modern times with this breed of dog particularily.

The Old English Sheepdog was already recognized by the AKC in 1905.

AKC Ranking: 69

Family: Livestock, Herding

Origin: England

Date of origin: 1800’s

Function: Sheep Herding

Today: Herding Trials

These dogs could be brown, but today are only recognized in grey and white. This dog has a very compact body. This dog became popular as a pet with the media in the mid 1900’s. It is used mostly as a pet or show dog today, and rarely as a working dog.

This is a gently fun loving dog. It is a marvelous family pet and often entertains its family with loveable and funny antics. It is protective of its family members, looking after the children as it would the sheep herd. It is friendly towards strangers, but can be a little headstrong, because of its intelligence. Dog obedience training is very important with this breed.

This dog needs daily play and exercise, preferably a nice long walk. This breed thrives on company so it does not make a good outside pet. It needs brushing regularly otherwise it tends to mat. It has a lifespan of 10 – 12 years.

It has a bear like shuffle and tends to amble along. It has a very pleasing fun loving intelligent expression.

The Old English Sheepdog is great addition to any family.

Ruth is actively involved with the internet, and she finds it very exciting. Her passions are pet health and dog training. She is a wife, a stepmom a dog owner and a business person. She is married for almost 30 years to Chris who has been, and still is, battling the monster MS. Two of her dogs are Certified Therapy Dogs. She is currently working from her home.

Her Home Blog
http://www.mimfreedom.com/blog

Her Dog Training Page
http://www.ruthsinformationabout.com/dog-obedience/sitstay/index.html

Her Pet Blog
http://www.happypetstop.com/blog

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ruth_Bird

The Loyal, Soft-Natured Newfoundland

By Carol Stack

The county fire department got the call from the animal shelter that a dog was trapped in a storm drain pipe. It took awhile but they finally succeeded in freeing the large black dog and she was taken to the local shelter for care. They had to completely shave her to get rid of all the mats.

She was obviously old and the days spent trapped in the drain pipe had affected her health. Who would ever adopt such a creature? They considered euthanizing her. But there was a shelter employee who would not give up on finding this dog a home.

The shelter employee called her neighbor, who happened to know someone who was interested in Newfoundland dogs. That is how Suzie ended up at our home.

Sweetness is the hallmark of the Newfoundland temperament, and Suzie was very sweet. They are also huge. Having Suzie lying across the family room floor was like having a black bear in the house. A male Newfoundland can weigh about 150 pounds. Suzie weighed in at 115 pounds. She ate as much as our other three dogs combined. Keep that in mind if you ever think of bringing one home.

The history of the Newfoundland could trace back to about 4 AD. Indian graves dating to that time have been found with skeletons of giant dogs. Whether those dogs were the ancestors of the Newfoundland dog is not verifiable, but it is known that the Newfoundland is one of the older dog breeds of today.

It is thought that the extinct American Black Wolf might be an ancestor to the Newfoundland. In turn, the Newfoundland is an ancestor of the present day Labrador and Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, and the St. Bernard owes its coat to the Newfoundland.

Today’s Newfoundland makes a great family pet. Their keen sense of responsiblity makes them an excellent companion dog for children of any age.

The Newfoundland is loyal, dignified, fun-loving and soft-natured. They are also obedient, easygoing, fairly inactive indoors, and will even adapt to apartment living as long as they are taken on brisk walks every day.

Why such a sweet-tempered dog as Suzie ended up alone and abandoned we will never know. It’s a sad fact that dog and cat abandonement is becoming more and more common in today’s world where we discard anything that is no longer wanted. We need to educate people that it’s better to take an unwanted dog or cat to a rescue or shelter than to drop them off in a field or strange neighborhood.

Suzie was with us for a year, living a life of leisure and comfort, before we had to euthanize her for her own sake. Her age had caught up to her. She was in pain and it was the kind thing to do. It is never easy to say goodbye to a pet, but Suzie was so gentle and loving it was especially hard to say goodbye. She will always be missed.

Copyright 2006 Carol Stack

Carol Stack has been working with dogs for more than three decades. She and her daughter, Christy, have created a web site that helps you care for, train, and choose your dog: www.christysdogportal.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carol_Stack

That Beautiful Gently Giant – The Bernese Mountain Dog

By Ruth Bird

The Bernese Mountain Dog belongs to the working group of dogs. In general, the working breeds are known for their intelligence and hardiness. The Bernese is a herding and draft dog. These dogs love the challenge of learning anything new. This dog is a surefire reason for dog obedience training. If you do not train this dog, you will have a very hard time to control it when walking. It’s sheer strength will oudo you in no time. Before you commit to this gentle giant of a dog, get a list of dog breeds and look through to make sure this is what you want.

AKC Ranking: 47

Family: Mountain Dog. Mastiff

Origin: Switzerland

Today’s function: herding

Also known as the Bernese Cattle Dog

A little bit of history:

This is the only mountain dog that has long silky hair. I read in one book that this dog can be traced back to the invasion of the Roman in Switzerland. The Roman cross bread their mastiff with the cattle dogs of Switzerland.

This dog is strong enough to withstand the cold weather and was strong enough to serve as a draft dog.

Being close to extinction, these dogs were found in the valleys of the lower Alps. Through the efforts of Dr. Heim these dogs were promoted throughout Switzerland and Europe. The first Bernese came to America in 1926 and they were granted recognition in the AKC in 1937.

Their Character

The Bernese is an easygoing, calm family dog. A Bernese dog is very sensitive and loyal and totally devoted to its family. It is also very good and gentle with children. They can be reserved with strangers. They do get along with other dogs and pets. They hate to be isolated from family activities.

The Bernese is know to mature slowly. They need firm training, but not harsh training because they are a very gently, playful, slow to mature breed. They just do not want to grow up.

Upkeep

Obviously, this is the kind of dog that enjoys the outdoors, and, the colder it is the better they like it. They need daily exercise, but it can be moderate exercise. This dog does not do well as an outside dog. It needs to be involved with its family.

Its coat does need brushing twice a week. Lifespan: 6-9 years.

Please make a note. These dogs can get heat stroke very easy and quickly, care must be taken in the heat.

They weigh about 90 – 120 pounds and are 25- 28 inches tall.

The Bernese Mountain Dog is a little bit longer than it is tall. It is a sturdy large dog. Surprisingly it has good strength, speed and agility.

It has a soft and gentle expression and a most beautiful color. This is truly a majestic looking dog.

Ruth is actively involved in using the internet for promotion, and she finds it very exciting. Her passions pet health and dog training. She is a wife, a stepmom a dog owner and a business person. She is married for almost 30 years to Chris who has been, and still is, battling the monster MS. Two of her dogs are Certified Therapy Dogs. She is currently working from her home. Her Home Blog http://www.mimfreedom.com/blog Her Dog Training Page http://www.ruthsinformationabout.com/dog-obedience/sitstay/index.html

Her Pet Blog http://www.happypetstop.com/blog

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ruth_Bird

The History Of The Pug

By Melissa Murray

Faithful, eager, clever, affectionate, good-natured, and impressibly high-spirited. These are all words that describe the Pug dog. The pug has a long history dating back to at least 700 B.C. Originated in China; the wrinkle that forms a W on its forehead was actually known as the Chinese character for “Prince”.

There is much debate on the subject of how the pug got its name. The first recorded appearance of the word pug in the English language was in 1566 meaning “endearment”. By 1600 the word came to be known to mean “courtesan” or “bargeman”. Then by the middle of the next century it finally appeared in the Oxford English Dictionary as “dwarf breed of dog resembling a miniature bulldog” which remains today.

The pug was known for its comical appearance, famous for its loyalty and bred as a companion. There is one story widely known that demonstrates this loyalty. In 1573 at William the Silent of Holland’s House of Orange, the now famous pug named Pompey awoke his master in the night right before a surprise attack by the Spaniards. Sir William escaped capture and Pompey became the symbol of the House of Orange. An effigy of the monarch with his pug at his feet is carved over William’s tomb in Delft Cathedral.

Another story displaying the obvious worthiness of the pug took place on the night of Napoleon’s wedding to Josephine. He had told her that he refused to share his bed with the animal and in return her beloved pug “Fortune” bit him. Josephine made it clear that Fortune would stay or she would not and from then on Napoleon shared his bed with the two.

Coming into the 18th century, the pug breed was accepted for registration by the American Kennel Club in 1885. Since registration the breed has been known as an excellent show dog but still remains the perfect loyal companion. Its motto “Multum in Parvo” means a lot a dog in a small space. The pug most definitely lives up its motto!

Melissa Murray is running her full-time web-based business selling all kinds of adorable and ideal dog clothing and accessories at great prices.

http://www.redcarpetdogclothes.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Melissa_Murray

The Irish Wolfhound – Easygoing and Soft-natured Giant

By: Carol Stack

Although not for the faint of heart, Irish Wolfhounds are strong, muscular, beautiful dogs that are usually even tempered and friendly. Originally they were used in Ireland to hunt wolves and Irish elk. But today they are a favorite among dog enthusiasts for their gentle disposition and commanding appearance.

The temperament of this dog breed is soft-natured and easygoing. They are calm around the house and patient. These qualities make them a good dog with children, pets, and other dogs.

History of the Breed

The Irish Wolfhounds in their earliest form were actually dogs that went to war and were trained to kill men and beasts. They were also used as guard dogs and as hunting dogs early on as well.

It is believed that their history has been long, perhaps even reaching all the way back to the first century BC. During the 19th century, when it became popular to give a number of these dogs as gifts to foreign royalty and as the wolf became extinct in Ireland, they almost became extinct.

Thankfully, Captain Graham began to breed Irish Wolfhounds with other breeds, such as Great Danes and Deerhounds, to keep the breed from dying out. This interbreeding led to variations in color and in a mellowing of the temperament as well.

Characteristics of Irish Wolfhounds

Although in history these dogs were used as war dogs and guard dogs, the Irish Wolfhound today does not make a great guard dog. While they do have a penchant to hunt, these dogs love people and require a great deal of interaction with the family.

The Irish Wolfhound is actually the tallest hound in the entire world and they are a stately and proud dog. Their coats feel rather rough to the touch, and they come in a variety of different colors, including brindle, pure white, red, brown, black, gray, and fawn.

They typically live to be about seven, although there are dogs that live to be as old as ten. Increasing numbers of breeders, however, are now selecting for longevity and this will hopefully increase the lifespan of the Irish Wolfhound in the future.

What Irish Wolfhounds Need

If you decide that you want to own an Irish Wolfhound, it is important that you take into consideration the special needs of these dogs and take care of them properly to promote the best health possible. They need plenty of room to stretch out and a daily long walk.

Irish Wolfhounds need to be with people and need plenty of interaction, so before you purchase one, you need to be sure that you have the time to properly take care of your dog.

It is important that you train your Irish Wolfhound well or he may get out of hand. Starting to train from the time your dog is a puppy will help you avoid problems later in the dog’s life.

Having an Irish Wolfhound can bring a great deal of joy and pleasure to your life and these dogs make wonderful companions. If you are ready to invest some time in a dog, take care of a dog properly, and you want a dog that will keep you company, you may want to consider having an Irish Wolfhound as a pet.

Carol Stack enjoys writing articles, especially about dogs. She lives with her husband, children, four dogs and seven cats in the United States. Carol and her daughter Christy are working on a web site that focuses on dog breeds, dog care, and dog training. You can visit it at www.christysdogportal.com

Is An Akita Inu The Right Dog For You?

By Lee Dobbins

The Akita, or Akita Inu hails from the Akita region of Japan where they breed has been revered for centuries. Throughout history they’ve been used as flood dogs, fighting dogs and for hunting deer and bear but today many people keep them as loving companions. Introduced to the United States in 1937 by Helen Keller the Akita Inu became even more popular after World War II when many American servicemen brought them back.

A member of the American Kennel Club working group, the Akita Inu was admitted to the AKC in 1972. It is a spitz type dog with the car and a triangular shaped head who weighs in at between 75 and 120 pounds. This dog has a powerful strong build with a deep, broad chest and level back. His ears stand erect on his head and he has dark brown eyes and a black or brown nose. The tail is carried high over the back. The Akita is a great swimmer due to his webbed feet. This dog has a double coat made up of a thick insulated undercoat and a waterproof outer coat and comes in white, red, sesame or brindle.

The Akita Inu is very affectionate with his family and while docile and home, can be aggressive towards other animals when he is outdoors being taken for walk. He is intelligent and fearless – a dog faithful to his family that craves companionship. This dog can be willful, however, so training will require patience as well as diversity since he can also become bored easily.

Like many purebred dogs the Akita does have some health issues that he is prone to. Hypothyroid and autoimmune thyroiditis can come up in this breed as can hip dysphasia. They can also suffer from terrible skin problems in immune diseases such as VKH. They can also have problems with their knees and our eyes.

Although they are a large dog, the Akita Inu can adapt well to apartment life as long as he gets sufficient exercise. In fact, a moderate amount of exercise is all this dog needs to keep in shape than happy.

This dog does not have any excessive grooming considerations, however the thick coat does shed heavily twice a year. They should be brushed with a firm bristle brush as often as needed and, of course, daily when shedding. Do not bathe your Akita unless it is necessary as giving him a bath will cause the natural waterproofing on their coat to be disrupted.

About the Author: Lee Dobbins writes for Dog Breeds 123 where you can learn more about dog care as well as information and photos of your favorite dog breeds inlcuding the Akita Inu.

Lowchen Puppy And Dog Information

By: Mitch Endick

The Lowchen is a small lap dog that is often cut to resemble a lion. They are a proud breed and make good watch dogs. They are affectionate dogs and are generally good with considerate children. They may be aggressive enough with other dogs to assume the top position in a family of more then one dog. They are considered intelligent, easy to train, and are generally good with non canine pets. They do not need a lot of room for exercise and brisk walks will do.

*Approximate Adult Size. The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the Lowchen is 10 to 13 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and 9 to 18 pounds. The female ranges smaller then the male

*Special Health Considerations. Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Lowchen is no exception. Although considered a healthy breed, be on the look out for patellar luxation, skin irritation and eye irritations by hair. This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian yearly for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

*Grooming. The Lowchen has a silky, long coat that needs to be professionally groomed to achieve the lion look. She should be brushed regularly. Brushing will help her maintain a clean and healthy coat, avoid mats and help you keep a closer eye on her health and strengthen your emotional bond with her.

Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet. Generally a guillotine type trimmer is the best for this chore and competent instructions to accomplish this can be found on the net.

*Life Span. The Lowchen can live between 13 and 15 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

*History. The Lowchen came from France. At one time they were considered the rarest breed. They are a bit more popular now. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1995.

Some Registries:
*Lowchen Club of America
*UKC United Kennel Club
*NKC National Kennel Club
*CKC Continental Kennel Club
*APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
*AKC American Kennel Club
*FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
*NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
*KCGB = Kennel Club of Great Britain
*ANKC = Australian National Kennel Club
*ACR = American Canine Registry

Litter Size: 3 to 6 Lowchen puppies

Category: Non-Sporting

Terms To Describe: Lively, bright, small, proud, positive, outgoing, intelligent, affectionate, inquisitive

*SPECIAL GOOD POINTS
Good watch dog.
This dog does not shed.
Very affectionate.
Easy to train.
Quick learner.
Wants to please.

*SPECIAL BAD POINTS
Poor guard dog.
They may dig.
They may be noisy.

*Other Names Known By: Little Lion Dog

*Every dog is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

Mitch Endick is a short article writer, editor and website developer for the popular pet site petpages.com. www.petpages.com is a pet information site with free pet ads, dog classifieds, and puppy for sale info Petpages.com also offers information on cats, fish, reptiles, birds, ferrets, rabbits, mice and even pet bugs.

Is The English Setter The Perfect Pet For Your Family?

By Lee Dobbins

If you looking for mild-mannered dog that is great with kids and loves long walks than the English Setter might be for you!

This hunting dog, makes a wonderful family pet being calm in the house requiring daily exercise. You’ll need to have a yard for him to run around In and take them on walks but he is great with children and has a sweet personality. The breed dates back to 16th century France where it was developed from the French Pointer and Spanish Pointer for hunting. In the 1800’s Sir Edward laverack further develop the breed into the dog we know today.

The English setter is a medium-sized slender dog which can grow to be between 23 and 27 inches tall and weighing between 45 and 80 pounds. He has a medium length coat which is white and has the interesting distinction of being speckled with varying size dots. His hair is slightly wavy and his medium length ears high pointed tail and the backs of his legs are fringed with hair. He has a long head and a pronounced stop with a square muzzle and large bright hazel colored eyes. His coat is white and the speckles can be in orange, brown, or blue.

The English Setter has the sweetest most mild-mannered personality which makes him a great family dog especially if you have children. He can be difficult to train though so you need to start with a consistent training program when he is young. Use only positive reinforcement as the English Setter will not respond well to harsh treatment. This breed can also become very vocal and might bark excessively unless you train him not to from an early age. A hunting dog by nature, the English Setter is great at retrieving, hunting, pointing and agility. While he will not be overly energetic in the house, the English setter does need a yard to plan and brisk walks every day.

The English Setter can tend to become overweight if you don’t watch what you feed him. This can cause a problem as this breed is prone to hip dysphasia. He doesn’t really have any other inherent health problems, although the females can be prone to false pregnancies. The English setter can live up to 12 years with the proper care.

Grooming the English Setter is not overly difficult but his medium length coat does need daily brushing. If you let your dog run and play in the woods, then you will have to inspect his hair for burrs and in the summer lookout for ticks. Be sure to brush out any knots in his hair as soon as you find them. This breed is only an average shedder and does not need to be bathed often.

Lee Dobbins is an avid dog lover and pet owner. She hosts http://www.dogbreeds123.com where you can find out more about dog care and dog breeds like the English Setter.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lee_Dobbins

Lakeland Terrier Puppy And Dog Information

By: Mitch Endick

The Lakeland Terrier is a happy dog that makes a great pet. They can be kept in an apartment as long as they can be walked frequently. They do best in a properly fenced in yard for exercise but remember that they are diggers so pay attention to possibly burying some of the fence. They need to be extensively socialized to get along with other pets. They generally love older, considerate children. As a reminder, never leave a child unsupervised with a puppy or dog.

*Approximate Adult Size. The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the Lakeland Terrier is 13 to 15 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and about 17 pounds for the male and about 15 pounds for the female.

*Special Health Considerations. Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Lakeland Terrier is no exception. Although considered to be a very hardy breed, be on the look out for cataracts and lens luxation. This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian yearly for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

*Grooming. The Lakeland Terrier has a double coat of soft inner and wiry hard outer hair. They may need loose hair plucked from the ear passages. The pads of their feet may also need to be trimmed. Their dead hair needs to be plucked several times a years and this is best done by a professional groomer.

Her ears should be checked once a week and be kept clean. If you have her professionally groomed, make sure ear cleaning and inspection is part of the package. No water or excess fluid should get in the dogs ears, and do not try to irrigate the ears. Ear cleaning is too complicated and critical to instruct here. Look for hair growing in the ear canal, excess wax, or moisture. If her ears have a discharge, foul odor or she seems to be in distress and you suspect an infection, or tumor, consult your veterinarian.

Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet. Generally a guillotine type trimmer is the best for this chore and competent instructions to accomplish this can be found on the net.

*Life Span. The Lakeland Terrier can live between 12 and 16 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

*History. The Lakeland Terrier comes from England where they were bred to hunt vermin. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1934.

Some Registries:
*United States Lakeland Terrier Club
*UKC United Kennel Club
*NKC National Kennel Club
*CKC Continental Kennel Club
*APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
*AKC American Kennel Club
*FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
*NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
*KCGB = Kennel Club of Great Britain
*ANKC = Australian National Kennel Club
*ACR = American Canine Registry

Litter Size: 3 to 5 Lakeland Terrier puppies

Category: Terrier

Terms To Describe: Hardy, brave, sturdy, friendly, confident, alert, graceful, bold

*SPECIAL GOOD POINTS
Good watch dog.
Generally love children.
Loving and affectionate pet.

*SPECIAL BAD POINTS
Poor guard dog.
Can be a digger.
They can be barkers.
Can be difficult to house break.
Can be willful.

*Other Names Known By: Cumberland Terrier

*Every dog is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

Mitch Endick is a short article writer, editor and website developer for the popular pet site petpages.com. www.petpages.com is a pet information site with free pet ads, dog classifieds, and puppy for sale info Petpages.com also offers information on cats, fish, reptiles, birds, ferrets, rabbits, mice and even pet bugs.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier Traits and Characteristics

By Donal Keenan

Before you bring a Staffordshire bull terrier puppy into your home, make sure you know what owning a ‘Staffy’ entails. Bear in mind that the cute little puppy you have set your heart on will grow into a powerful and muscular animal which will require firm handling and lots of time and energy. This breed of dog is very strong and requires firmness and consistency while training. You need to be sure that you wish to commit yourself to your dog’s welfare for the next 10 -12 years.

Of course, the Staffordshire bull terrier has many wonderful inherent characteristics – he is a dog with special intrinsic qualities, which makes him an endearing pet. The Stafford is renowned for its affinity with humans and is exceptionally good with children and infants. Adored and adoring within their own family circle, these dogs are more than happy to share your home with you rather than spending long periods on their own in a kennel. They really enjoy getting involved in family activities like car rides, going on hikes and walks, romping on the beach, and especially cuddling up with you when you settle down for an evening of TV watching or reading. Staffords will also often be boisterously welcoming with visitors and you and your friends have to be ready for this. These dogs are incredibly like humans in a furry form!

Although each dog will have its own individual personality traits, there are some personality characteristics common to all dogs of this breed. Staffords are tough, courageous, tenacious, and stubborn by temperament. They are also very protective, curious, active, quick and agile. The Staffordshire bull terrier is highly intelligent and being ever eager to please, he will give you and your family a lifetime of devotion.

As puppies, these dogs need to chew on anything they can set their teeth into and need a safe alternative to furniture, toys and clothing for their busy jaws. Stafford puppies love to play rough, but you must make it clear right from the start who is the boss. This is not a difficult task if you begin working with your Staffie when she or he is a puppy. Puppies require a lot of time and patience and to housebreak will require double the effort and twice the patience. Of course, these puppies love people and need to be comforted and loved in return.

When a Stafford shows its teeth in a snarl, it can be rather disconcerting. They look tough and strikingly menacing, but because of their natural fondness for people, DO NOT make good guard dogs. These dogs can be trained for agility and competitive obedience.

The Staffordshire bull terrier does everything with persistence, passion and intensity. Totally fearless and curious, these dogs love a challenge and variety. These energetic dogs are active from dawn to dusk, and are unable to be left for long periods without outside stimulation. Whilst they thrive on being with people, they react if challenged by another dog. Born fighters, these dogs possess the strength and tenacity of the Bulldog with the exceptional athletic ability of the Terrier. Staffords also have no fear of traffic and sadly often become road accident victims.

These trustworthy dogs with their sound temperament are faithful companions to humans all through their life.

Donal Keenan is editor and publisher of Staffordshire Bull Terriers Website.
Visit his Staffordshire Bull Terrier forum for more info on the dog breed and to meet with other Staffy lovers.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Donal_Keenan