Archive for the Airedale Terrier category

The Terrier Breeds

Terriers are among the most diverse breeds, ranging from the tiny toy Yorkie to the large Airedale. Originally developed to hunt and trap small game, the group has largely changed its role in human life over the past 200 years. But the wide range of size, temperament and appearance has caused terriers to continue to be among the most popular group in the world.

Even within a single subset, such as the smaller breeds, variety is everywhere with terriers. Jack Russells look and behave very differently from Westies. A Scottie and a Yorkie are roughly the same size, but have very different attitudes in detail, while still retaining many general terrier characteristics.

Medium-sized terriers, such as the American Staffordshire Terrier and the Welsh Terrier could hardly look more different. To the novice, it would be hard to find reasons to put them into the same category. Yet both have similar lineage, being developed not far from one another by modern measurements of distance.

Larger terriers look still more different from their smaller cousins. The Airedale, the Lakeland Terrier and the Irish Terrier are much more similar to one another, in appearance and behavior, than they are to the smaller breeds. Yet, a Kerry Blue – while much larger than the Scottie – was bred in similar circumstances and show common behaviors. That shows in the stance, the coat and other attributes, such as their high spirits and able mountain herding ability.

These are all very different from others that carry the terrier name. The Border Terrier resembles a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, even though the former is quite a bit taller. Both have the same square head, close coat and highly alert nature. Yet, you could hardly find two terriers more closely related, while looking dissimilar, than the Smooth Fox Terrier and the Wire-Haired Fox.

This ‘similarity within diversity’ is no accident, of course. Originally bred to hunt, many breeds were narrowed to perform that service for a group of prey that is equally varied. Fox and rabbit are similar enough to be hunted by the same breed. But animals that live above ground, such as tree squirrels, require a different technique.

That variation took on even larger dimensions as the generations went by and hunting became much less common. Everything from sports contests to film production, from watchdog and drug-sniffing duty to Border Patrol has called terriers into action. Breeding a dog to perform services for the deaf is naturally going to take a very different turn from one who will simply be a family pet.

Tastes in terriers run as wide a range as the breeds. Some like the portability and cute look of a little Westie. Others will find their hearts stolen by a miniature schnauzer, with their floppy ears and quizzical look. Still others can’t resist the sweet good nature of an Airedale and enjoy their tall, proud stance and beautiful appearance.

But whether one’s taste runs to the Manchester, looking a lot like a Doberman, or preference is for the tiny Norfolk, there’s a terrier just right for you.

Airedale Terrier – The King of the Terriers

Airedale Terrier – The King of the Terriers

by Dakota Dog

The Airedale Terrier is a medium 45 to 65 pound dog that usually reaches between 22″ and 24″. Known as the King of the Terriers, they are largest of the Terrier breeds recognized by the AKC. It is a compact little powerhouse that is all terrier when it comes to chasing little animals or appeasing its curiosity.

Airedale Terriers are typically tan on the ears, head, chest, undersides, legs, and sometimes on the shoulders. They are black or grizzle on the sides and upper parts of the body. Sometimes they have a red mixture on the black or white markings on the chest. Certain strains of the breed also have a small white patch on the chest. Their wiry, dense outer coat requires regular grooming.

If you are looking for a dog with plenty of stamina and energy, look no further. The Airedale Terrier is full of energy and needs daily exercise and play. Generally speaking, they do best with older well behaved children and are not ideal for homes with smaller pets as terriers have the tendency to chase small animals and vermin. They can do well with other dogs, especially if they are socialized from puppyhood. They are loyal and protective if their family. They love to learn and can be trained easily provided training is fun and not monotonous.

The breed dates itself back to 18th century England. The breed is a cross between an Otterhound and a Waterside Terrier. They were bred for hunting small game and were later used in big game hunting, police work and as an army dog in WWII. The Airedale Terrier is now considered more of a family pet than working dog. However, they do love to work and have tasks to do and still make good hunting and tracking dogs For a family that enjoys outdoors and exercise, the Airedale Terrier is an excellent choice. Although they can work with other pets and dogs, a one pet household seems more ideal for their needs unless they grow up with other family pets. The Airedale Terrier is a great pet for the family on the go.

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About the Author

Visit our Dog Page and Forum http://www.deardoggy.com/ and it’s sister blog http://www.doggylog.com/ For more information on the Airedale Terrier visit our dog breed page at http://www.deardoggy.com/dog_breeds/airedale_terrier/

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Non-Shedding Dog Breeds

Non-Shedding Dog Breeds

by Kirsten Hawkins

Many people would love to own a pet dog, but are wary of the potential mess that shed dog hair can cause in their homes. These people want a dog that doesn’t shed to be their companion. Unfortunately there is no such thing as a dog that doesn’t shed at all. All dogs will shed and replace at least some of their hair, just like people do. There are some breeds that shed far less than others, however, and selecting one of these breeds can keep the shedding mess to a minimum.

Airedale Terrier:

The Airedale terrier is a large terrier with a rough coat that sheds very little. These dogs can be good with children, but such socialization needs to start early in the dog’s life. They may play too roughly for small children. These are loyal and trainable dogs, but are also very naturally curious and not easily coaxed away from something that catches their interest. The Airedale usually grows to about 22-24 inches in height and a weight of 50-65 pounds.

Cockapoo:

The Cockapoo is reminiscent of the Poodle, especially in the face. It has a short, curly coat and does not shed much but does require above average grooming. It is actually a cross between the American Cocker Spaniel and the Poodle, hence its appearance and name (Cocker + Poodle = Cockapoo). These dogs are very friendly, loyal, and playful. They are good with children and other dogs and are typically very easy to train.

Italian Greyhound:

The Italian Greyhound is a miniature Greyhound. The body style of this dog is nearly exactly like that of his racing cousins, but in a convenient, compact size. These dogs are gentle and submissive. They become very emotionally attached to their people. They are obedient and easy to train, but prone to mischief – and they know when they’ve been naughty. They get along well with children – if the children are well behaved. If the kids are high strung and rambunctious, the dog will be too. It is best in a quiet household. The coat of the Italian Greyhound is short and sleek and they don’t shed much at all.

Miniature Poodle:

The Miniature Poodle is not truly a breed all to itself, but one of the three AKC recognized sizes of Poodles. Like all Poodles, they shed very little, but their short, curly coats require considerable grooming. They are very intelligent, playful, and quite trainable. They generally get along well with children, but they can be sensitive or nervous around rowdy kids. They easily integrate with a family and feel that they have to be a part of all family activities. They will often act as though they’ve been slighted if not included in family activities.

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About the Author

Kirsten Hawkins is a dog lover and animal expert from Nashville, TN. Visit http://www.doghealth411.com/ for more information on dog health, the care of dogs, and dog travel.

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