Archive for the Boxer category

Is a Boxer the Right Breed for You?

If you want a dog that is a marshmallow with your children, but a strong deterrent to criminals, you may want to take a look at the Boxer. The Boxer gets its name from its habit of using its front legs to box when it is fighting. These powerful dogs were originally used as hunting dogs, although they quickly became popular as police and military dogs in Europe. As people began to discover how devoted and loving the Boxer was to its family, this dog breed turned into a companion dog, as well. Interestingly enough, the versatile Boxer didn’t become popular in the United States until men returning from fighting in World War II brought some of these dogs home with them.

Although Boxers are considered to be medium sized dogs, they have the strength of a big dog. A young, healthy Boxer is all muscle and energy and weighs in at fifty to eighty pounds. These dogs have a broad chest, a wide skull and a face similar to that of a Bulldog. Their big brown eyes are very expressive and these dogs are not above using a pitiful ‘poor me’ look to get their own way.

Boxers should be fawn or brindle with black mask like markings on their face. A dog with white markings is considered to be flashy. However, if a Boxer has more than one third of its body covered in white or is completely white, it will be unable to compete in the show ring. Also, white Boxers are prone to deafness, as well as other health problems.

If you live in an apartment, a Boxer may not be the right breed for you. These dogs are high energy animals and really need to be able to exercise frequently. A home with a securely fenced yard is ideal for a Boxer. You will need to be sure the fence is high enough and secure enough to prevent your dog from escaping, since a Boxer can easily jump over lower fences.

Although most Boxers get along well with other dogs, you may not want to buy a Boxer if you have a small dog or cat. If you do have other dogs, consider neutering your Boxer at six months to keep aggression toward other dogs in check. Small children and Boxers get along quite nicely, although your Boxer may be too energetic to play with toddlers until he matures. After all, a young, exuberant Boxer can easily knock an adult flat with an overly enthusiastic greeting.

Since Boxers are so high energy and so powerful, these dogs need to be enrolled in obedience training while they are still easy to control. Puppy classes can also help you socialize your Boxer and will teach him to play nicely with other dogs. These dogs are eager to please and should pick up basic obedience commands quickly. You may want to consider advanced obedience and agility training for your Boxer, as well.

Boxers require very little grooming. Simply brush through your dog’s sleek coat once a week to remove loose hair so you don’t have to vacuum it off of your floor. You should also clean your dog’s teeth and check his nails to see if they need to be trimmed.

Boxers are hearty eaters. You should consider feeding your dog a food formulated for large dogs, since Boxers are prone to hip dysplasia. These dogs have relatively few other serious health problems. You may want to check for a history of heart or thyroid disease before buying a puppy.

So, if you want a dog who will be a devoted friend and companion, then a Boxer may be the perfect choice for you.

Dog Breeds A-Z

By Sarah Freeland

Finding the perfect pet is difficult when there are so many different breeds to choose from. Use this guide to learn more about a few of the different breed available.

Alaskan Malamute

The Alaskan Malamute is the oldest Arctic dog breed in the world and was bred as a working dog. They were used to pull sleds as well as hunt. This is a friendly dog that makes a great family pet. They love children, but aren’t fond of the company of other dogs. They are a smart breed that can learn quickly but tend to get bored easily.

To groom this breed you will need to brush their fur out weekly. Some of the health concerns associated with this breed include growth problems, eye problems, and hip dysplasia.

Bloodhound

The Bloodhound, also referred to as the St. Hubert’s Hound or the Chien St. Hubert, is a Belgium breed that was bred tracking and hunting. This is one of the oldest hound breeds in the world. They typically grow to be between 23 and 27 inches tall and they usually weigh between 80 and 90 pounds. They have a short smooth coat that is waterproof. Their coat colors vary between black and tan and red and tan. Red Bloodhounds can also be found. They have folds of skin around their face and neck which help to gather scent and direct it towards their nose.

To care for this breed you will need to rub down their coats with a wet towel a few times a week. Their toenails will also need to be clipped on a weekly basis. Their ears also need to be tended to on a regular basis. For exercise this breed needs daily runs and lots of play time. To keep their minds stimulated you may want to introduce tracking games. This breed has a few health concerns that you should be aware of: hip dysplasia, inverted eyelids, and bloating.

Boxer

The Boxer is a German breed that was created by crossing a Bullenbeisser, an unknown breed, and an English Bulldog. This breed was originally very aggressive and used for fighting and baiting bulls. However, over the years this breed lost their aggressiveness and it has become better suited for family life.

The boxer is a mid-sized dog breed that typically stands between 21 and 25 inches tall. They usually weigh between 66 and 70 pounds. Their coat is short, smooth and shiny. Their coat can come in a variety of colors and have several different marking patterns. Some of the most common colors Boxers have include white, brindle, and fawn.

Brussels Griffon

The Brussels Griffon, also referred to as the Griffon Belge, the Griffon Bruxellois, and the Belgian Griffon, is a small Belgium dog breed that was used to kill vermin in horse stables. This interesting looking little fellow stands between 7 and 8 inches tall and weighs in at a whopping 6 to 12 pounds. They come in two varieties, rough hair and smooth hair. Both versions can be found with black, black and tan, or red colored coats.

To care for this little dog you will want to brush their coat several times a week to prevent matting and to remove debris and dirt. They can usually get enough exercise to stay healthy by playing indoors, however, they also enjoy spending time frolicking outside and going for short walks. This dog will need to be trained and you will need to be consistent with your praise and corrections. If you plan on breeding this dog you should understand that they have a very difficult time whelping and only about 60 percent of puppies make it. In addition to reproductive problems, this breed also has respiratory issues and eye problems.

Chihuahua

The Chihuahua is a Mexican breed that was discovered about 100 years ago. They are a toy dog that stands between 6 and 9 inches tall and they typically weigh less than 6 pounds. Their coats come in two variations, short and long. The long coat is soft and can be either straight or wavy. The short coat is soft and dense. Both coat variations can come in just about any color or color combination.

To care for this breed you will need to groom their hair daily for the long haired version, and as needed for the short hair version. This is an indoor pet that is not suited for extended periods of time outside. However, they do enjoy playing outside and going for short walks. To manage this breed’s temperament you need to socialize it and train it early. Some of the health concerns that are associated with this breed include kneecap problems, eye problems, and tracheal problems.

English Springer Spaniel

The English Springer Spaniel, also referred to as the Norfolk Spaniel, is a British breed that is known for being the oldest spaniel breed in the world. They were originally developed as a hunting dog. Their name derives from the springy steps that they take when on the hunt. Today this breed is still used as a hunting dog, however, they also make a great family pet if trained and socialized properly.

The English Springer Spaniel requires regular grooming to keep its coat shiny and clean. The best type of brush to use on their soft coat is a stiff bristle brush. Bathing should only be done when they need it. This breed also needs a lot of exercise. Long walks and plenty of play time in the yard or in a fenced in park each day will keep them healthy, happy, and out of trouble.

Fox Terrier (Smooth)

The Fox Terrier (Smooth) is a cute little dog that originated in England as a vermin hunter. This breed was grouped with the Wired Fox Terrier until 1984 when it was established as its own unique breed. Today this breed is still used to hunt vermin, however, it is also used as a family pet.

The Smooth Fox Terrier is a playful, energetic breed that loves playing with kids. If you have other pets in your family this breed may chase them, especially if they are small like cats. And they may try to take the dominate role if you have other dogs. To keep them happy and healthy they will need lots of exercise, lots of mental stimulation, and a lot of attention. They are intelligent and respond well to obedience training, however, they have a stubborn streak that may keep them from coming to you when you call them, especially if they are having fun.

Fox Terrier (Wire)

The Fox Terrier (Wire), also called the Wire Fox Terrier, is a British breed that was developed back in the 19th century as a vermin hunter. This breed most likely descends from the Beagle, Shropshire and Cheshire. Today, this very active dog breed is used as both a family pet and a vermin hunter.

This little dog stands about 15.5 inches tall and weighs between 16 and 18 pounds. Their have short wiry hair that gives them a plush look. Their coats should be predominantly white with tan and/or black markings. This dog makes a great playmate for kids. However, you will want to be careful what other pets you pair this dog with as it has a tendency to chase anything that is small than it is.

Greyhound

The Greyhounds is an Egyptian breed that was originally used to hunt wolves, wild boars and deer. This breed was originally associated with aristocracy and high class citizenship. Today this breed is used for racing, hunting and for pets.

The Greyhound is a tall athletic dog that stands between 27 and 30 inches tall and weighs between 60 and 70 pounds. They usually have a short, close coat that comes in a variety of colors including: multi-color, white, blue, fallow brindle, black, and red. This dog is truly a gentle giant that are great with kids. Since they were bred as hunting dogs they have a natural instinct to chase anything smaller then they are so they may not be the best house mates for small pets.

Puli

The Puli, also called the Pulik, the Hungarian Puli and the Hungarian Water Dog, is a herding dog that originated in Hungary. It is a medium sized dog that stands between 14 and 19 inches tall and weighs between 20 and 40 pounds. They have a shaggy and weatherproof outercoat and a soft wooly undercoat. Their coloring is usually pretty dark. The most common colors found in this breed include black, dark rust, gray, and apricot.

Sealyham Terrier

The Sealyham Terrier, is a terrier breed that originated in Wales. This breed most likely developed from crossing the Cheshire Terrier, the Welsh Corgi, the Dandi Dinmont Terrie, the West Highland Terrier and the Fox Terrier. It is a small dog that only stands about 12 inches high and it weigh between 18 and 20 pounds. They have a coat similar to the Scottish Terrier, however, their coat colors are slightly different. The Sealyham Terrier comes in shades of white, lemon, blue, badger pied, black, and brown.

Vizsla

The Vizsla, also called the Hungarian Vizsla, the Magyar Vizsla, the Drotszoru Magyar Vizsla, and the Hungarian Pointer, is a Hungarian sporting dog breed. They are a medium sized dog that stands between 22.5 and 25 inches tall and that weighs between 48.5 and 66 pounds. They have a short straight coat that comes in a brownish red color. White traces on their chest and feet are common. The Vizsla is a sweet nature dog that is gentle and tolerant. They make a great family dog and companion, as well as a great hunting dog.

Whippet

The Whippet is a British breed that was created by crossing the Greyhound with a variety of terrier breeds. This dog was originally used as a mouser and vermin hunter, however, they also made a living at the dog races. Today this dog is used for both hunting and as a companion.

The Whippet is hound dog that stands between 17 and 20 inches tall and weighs about 28 pounds. They have a short, fine coat that comes in a variety of colors and patterns. When you look at this dog they look just like a miniature Greyhound.

Yorkshire Terrier

The Yorkshire Terrier, is a toy dog breed that originated in Great Britain. They were originally used as a lap dog and fashion accessory by Victorian aristocracy. Many dog experts believe that this breed was created by crossing the Skye Terrier, Clydesdale Terrier, the Manchester Terrier, the Paisley and the Maltese.

The Yorkshire Terrier is petite and it only stands between 6 and 9 inches tall and it weighs between 3 and 7 pounds. They have a silk long coat that is variegated. Steel blue and tan are common shades found in their coat.

Dog behavior, pet training and puppy breeder information all in one place online. The ultimate resource for dog owners. Learn expert dog training technique, advice to help with dog behavior problems, a dog training forum as well as a directory of dog trainers and breeders all over the country to help you locate a professional near you. Learn about puppy obedience training, pet nutrition, dog obedience, housebreaking and more. Check out our puppy training e-book for more tips to help you raise an obedient pet and companion.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sarah_Freeland

5 Things You Didn’t Know About A Boxer Dog

By Richard Cussons

Before purchasing a Boxer–or any dog–you should consider various aspects to decide if this is the right breed for you. The worse thing you can do as a dog owner is not research the potential dog. If you don’t, you may find yourself surprised, or overwhelmed and unable to work with the breed. Boxers have their own set of challenges so it is important to understand them.

One: grooming. With its short coat, the Boxer is an extremely easy breed to groom. This is a low maintenance dog that only requires a quick brushing every day; bathing need only occur when necessary. Also, Boxers are fastidious creatures that will clean themselves, like cats. For those looking for an easy to care for pet, the Boxer ranks high.

Two: exercise. The Boxer is an active breed so those looking for just a house dog should reconsider. Though this dog will want to be in the house with you, it will want plenty of time outdoors for play. Boxers, being very energetic, respond well to structured ctivities like games of fetch or frisbee. They do not do well by just lying around the house. If you are not able to spend the time with them, this is not the breed for you.

Three: health concerns. Larger dogs always have certain health risks and the Boxer is no different. This breed runs the chance of: cardiomyopathy, sub-aortic stenosis or hip dysphasia. Also, after the age of eight, this breed is more likely to develop tumors than other dogs. This is why you must buy your Boxer from an experienced breeder. With these potential risks, all dogs must be properly screened, and regular trips to the Vet should be planned.

Four: temperament. The Boxer’s temperament is both its greatest advantage and its potential downfall. This is a highly playful, spirited dog that becomes greatly attached to its owners. This is also a dog that suffers from mischievous instincts (such as the need to chew) and separation anxiety. When you own a Boxer, be prepared to find a devoted, though sometimes stubborn, breed that will want to go everywhere with you.

Five: protection. Many assume that, because of the Boxer’s sturdy frame, it makes an excellent protector. This is both correct and not so. The Boxer is, generally, a friendly pet that will welcome strangers. But, if it feels its family is threatened, it will take down an intruder. What you must take note of is: some areas require that you register larger breeds, like Boxers, and will charge money for their presence. While you can use a Boxer as protection, you must be careful–many cities will fine you for any suspected offense.

Richard Cussons is a champion for dogs of all breeds but Boxers in particular. You can find out more about Boxer dogs at the Boxer Savvy web site.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Richard_Cussons

Worried About Which Breed of Dog is Best for Your Family? Find Some Answers Here

Worried About Which Breed of Dog is Best for Your Family? Find Some Answers Here

By Niall Kennedy

Ask ten experts how many breeds of dogs exist and you will get ten different answers. However, many estimate there are more than 300 breeds of dogs. Each is valued by someone or by a group of people. In fact, they exist because they were bred to have characteristics that make them well suited for specific tasks. Over thousands of years, dogs were bred to meet a variety of human needs.

Chihuahuas, Pekinese and Shih-Tzus are generally known as toy breeds – very small types of dogs, often weighing less than ten pounds. The dogs were bred to be mainly companions rather than perform physical labor. These dogs were the basis of the phrase “lap” dogs as they were easily held in their owners’ laps.

Dogs in the Hound group come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, and were all originally bred to assist with hunting. Many hound types have an amazing sense of smell; others are best known for their stamina during the chase.

German shepards, Doberman pinchers, Rottweilers, Mastiffs, Giant Schnauzers and Boxers are just a few of the better known types of working dogs.

Working dogs have the size and strength that makes them well suited to guarding property and other intense physical tasks. They are well known for their extremely high intelligence and protective nature to their human companions.

Like the Hounds, dogs from the Sporting group were bred to assist with hunting. Alert and active by nature, sporting dogs fit in well with active owners. If you plan on adding any type of sporting dog to your family, keep in mind that these high-energy dogs need frequent exercise.

The dog breeds included in the Non-Sporting group vary greatly in appearance and abilities. Dalmatians, with their vast amount of stamina and energy, were set to run alongside carriages to guard the travelers inside. Later, firemen employed these unique dogs to guard fire wagons. Dalmatians are playful and loyal, and need human companionship.

Poodles were originally bred as work animals. These dogs are highly intelligent and one of the most trainable breeds. Some poodles are good guard dogs and some can be trained as hunters.

Terriers are known for their distinctive personalities. Bred to hunt vermin, terriers are instinctive, active diggers. Tenacious by nature, these lively dogs require owners willing to provide lots of physical and mental stimulation.

Sight hounds were bred to assist the hunter by virtue of their excellent eyesight. Instead of finding prey by scent, these lean hunters spot their quarry from a great distance. They have amazing stamina and energy and all members of this group need plenty of exercise.

Hopefully this information will help you to decide what breed of dog is right for bringing into your family. Whichever breed you decide on you need to remember that your dog will rely on you for everything from food and water, to shelter and exercise. In return for this you can expect lifelong devotion and love from your new best friend.

Best Pet Health Information is a resource which will help you find infomation, hints and tips to keep your dog happy and healthy. http://www.best-pet-health.info Copyright © Best-Pet-Health.info. All rights reserved. This article may be reprinted in full so long as the resource box and the live links are included intact.

Article Source: Niall Kennedy

Boxer Complete Profile

Boxer Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Boxer

Key Facts:

Size: Medium
Height: 53 – 61 cm (21 – 24 inches)
Weight: 28 – 30 kg (62 – 66 lb)
Life Span: 12 years
Grooming: Easy
Exercise: Demanding
Feeding: Medium
Temperament: Fearless & energetic
Country of Origin: Germany
AKC Group: Working

Temperament:
The Boxer is intelligent, alert, fearless, loyal and self-assured. Boxers are very extroverted with high levels of energy and they are often boisterous. This breed are bright and friendly when playing and are determined and brave when aroused. Boxers can be distrustful of strangers and make good watchdogs and guard dogs. They respond well to firm consistent discipline and training. Boxers make excellent companions for adults and children.

Grooming:
The coat of a Boxer is easily cared for and regular brushing will eliminate moulting.

Exercise:
Boxers require substantial exercise. They enjoy playing and romping with other dogs and will happily play with a ball with their owner. When they’re adult dogs you can let them run beside a cycle, as a form of exercise. A Boxers concept of exercise is that life is to be lived at speed.

Feeding:
Boxers are not particularly greedy dogs, but their appetites need to be controlled to prevent them becoming overweight.

History:
The Boxer originated from the Tibetan Mollossus and European mastiff family. They were originally used in Germany for bear and bull baiting. In the 19th century, the breed reached a certain amount of conformity following selective crosses between Great Danes and English Bulldogs. The origins of the name “Boxer” is unclear. Some believe it is a corruption of the German word “Beiszer” meaning biter of bulls, while others state it comes from the word “boxl”, an alternate name for the now extinct Brabanter dog.

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Muscular body with no fat, solid, smooth coat and courageous.
Colour: Brindle, red or fawn with white markings on the muzzle, neck, chest and feet or legs. Black mask.
Coat: Short, shiny and hard hair. Very tight to the body.
Tail: Set high, usually docked and carried erect.
Ears: Moderate size, set high, thin, lying flat and close to the cheek when in repose. Some countries allow the ears to be cropped to a point, not too broad and carried erect.
Body: Square, curved ribs and the belly forms a curve towards the rear of the dog. The back is short, straight, broad and well-muscled.

Additional Comments:

The Boxer is one of the best guarding breeds and they consider their family as theirs to guard.
Boxers can be too boisterous for some owners and are more appropriate for an energetic handler or family.
Inherited conditions of Boxers include eye problems, extra incisor teeth and heart problems. The owner should always buy from a reputable breeder to reduce the likeliness of these problems.

~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/boxer/