Archive for the Cockapoo category

Dog Breed Comparison – Do Your Research Beforehand to Ensure Compatability with Family and Other Pet

By Sarah Freeland

There are hundreds of different dog breeds to choose from. Before selecting a puppy or dog to adopt be sure to do some research on the breed to ensure compatibility with your family, children and other pets. Here we have outlined a few common breeds to help you in your search for the perfect dog.

Sussex Spaniel

The Sussex Spaniel is a British sporting dog that was originally used to hunt partridge. This breed most likely was developed by crossing the Bloodhound with the Clumber Spaniel. It is a smaller dog that only stands between 15 and 16 inches tall and weighs between 40 and 50 pounds. They have a typical long wavy spaniel coat that comes in shades of gold, liver, and puce. They are a very friendly dog that makes a great companion and a great family dog, especially if they are properly trained and socialized.

Kerry Blue Terrier

The Kerry Blue Terrier, also called the Irish Blue Terrier, is an Irish breed that was created in the 18th century. It was originally used as a herding dog, vermin catcher, and waterfowl retriever. Today this breed is used as a guard dog and as a pet.

The Kerry Blue Terrier usually stands between 18 and 19 inches tall and weighs between 33 and 37 pounds. Their coat is soft and wavy and comes in shades of blue with black points, blue without black points, and small white patches on their chest is also common. The Kerry Blue Terrier is great with kids. They are happiest when kept as the only pet, as they may show male dog aggression. It you have a cat then you will need to socialize your Kerry from a young age with the cats, otherwise you could have trouble.

Giant Schnauzer

The Giant Schnauzer, also referred to as a Riesenschnauzer, is a German breed that was developed to be a cattle dog. It is suspected that this breed was created by crossing rough-coated shepherd, Bouvier des Flandres, smooth-coated drover dogs, and Great Danes. Today this breed is used as a guard dog, as a watch dog and as a family dog.

This impressive breed stands between 23.5 and 27.5 inches tall and weighs between 70 and 77 pounds. Their coat is short and wiry and it comes in solid black or salt and pepper variations. This is a very loyal and protective breed that can fit into just about any type of family as long as they are socialized properly. To keep the Giant Schnauzer happy and healthy you will need to provide it with plenty of exercise and mental stimulation.

Cockapoo

The Cockapoo is a popular mixed breed that developed in the United States. This breed was created by crossing the Miniature Poodle and the American Cocker Spaniel. The size of this dog is going to depend on the size of their parents, however, they tend to be between 9 and 13 inches tall and weigh between 6 and 19 pounds. The advantage of this breed is that they are a low shedder, which makes them a great pet option for people with allergies.

To care for this mixed breed you will need to brush their coats on a regular basis. This will help to prevent matting and skin problems. They don’t need a lot of exercise but a nightly walk will help keep them healthy. While both the poodle and the cocker spaniel have health problems, the crossing of these two breeds seems to cancel out most of these problems. Cockapoos are generally a very healthy breed, however, fatty tumors and hip problems can sometimes develop.

Bulldog

The Bulldog, also referred to as the English Bulldog, is the national symbol for Great Britain. Originally this breed was used to manage oxen, to guard property, to hunt, and to bait large game. Today this breed is mostly a fun-loving family dog.

The Bulldog is a small dog that only stands about 12 to 14 inches tall. However, even though they are short they are a relatively heavy set dog weighing in around 55 pounds when fully grown. They have a short smooth coat that comes in both solid colors and variegated color patterns. The most common colors found in this breed include black, red, brown, brindles, and piebald. Because of the build of this breed they have a tendency to over heat, have problems breathing, and have a difficult time whelping.

Redbone Coonhound

The Redbone Coonhound is a Georgia creation that developed by crossing the Bloodhound with the Foxhound. The males of this breed are larger than the females. They stand between 22 and 27 inches tall and weigh between 45 and 65 pounds. The females stand between 21 and 25 inches tall and weigh between 45 and 65 pounds. They have short shiny coats that are very fine. They have a solid red coat with small traces of white near their chests and feet. This is a loyal and loving breed that will do what ever it can to make you happy.

Shiba Inu

The Shiba Inu, also called the Japanese Small-Size Dog and the Brushwood Dog, is a Japanese non-sporting dog. This breed was almost wiped out in the 1950s because of a distemper outbreak. The Shiba Inui is a medium sized dog that stands between 13.5 and 16.5 pounds and weighs between 18 and 25 pounds. It has a straight, harsh coat that comes in salt and pepper, black, black and tan, red, and black and white color variations. As far as their temperament goes they get along with kids if they are raised around kids, however, they tend to have same sex dog aggression that you will need to watch out for if you have other pets.

Dog behavior, pet training and puppy breeder information all in one place online. The ultimate resource for dog owners. Learn expert dog training technique, advice to help with dog behavior problems, a dog training forum as well as a directory of dog trainers and breeders all over the country to help you locate a professional near you. Learn about puppy obedience training, pet nutrition, dog obedience, housebreaking and more. Check out our puppy training e-book for more tips to help you raise an obedient pet and companion.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sarah_Freeland

“Designer” or Mixed Breed Dogs

“Designer” or Mixed Breed Dogs

By Gage Killian

Designer dogs are the up and coming rage among Hollywood and dog lovers alike. Dogs like the puggle (pug + beagle), the cockapoo aka cockerpoo or spoodle(cocker-spaniel + poodle), the labradoodle (Labrador retriever + poodle), the peekapoo (pekingnese + poodle) and the Schnoodle (Schnauzer + Poodle) are growing ever more popular today than ever before. Why are these “mutts” so big right now?

1. Cute Names – Designer dogs have cute names that people love and make the appearance of a new breed of dog that very few have heard of. For example: the puggle.

2. Great for those with allergies – Unlike some purebred dogs, designer dogs are often bred to reduce the amount of allergens they produce by not having an undercoat.

3. Sheds less – Some designer dogs are bred to shed less than other dogs.

4. Genetic advantage – Believed to be less prone to inbreeding, the designer dog is thought to have better temperaments and also thought to be smarter and more trainable than their purebred counter parts.

Controversy surrounding these dogs have made purebred dog owners enraged. It’s bad for there business and the qualities listed above only hold true in specific cases. The designer dog fad has also had its fallbacks.

1. Bad breeding – bad breeding leads to unwanted dogs. Many people want to produce a designer dog without doing back-ground checks and without the skills needed to do so.

2. Bad owners – Some believe that just because they bought a designer dog means that they don’t need to train, care for or love their pet as much. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Designer dogs need just as much care and attention as all other dogs do, if not more.

3. More expensive – the price for these dogs have sky-rocketed sometimes hit the $1,000 mark. Sometimes its better just to go to the humane society or animal shelter and find a perfectly fine dog. The shots and care for these dogs can make their prices higher as well.

Don’t get me wrong, these are wonderful pets. However, they need wonderful owners as well. Love and care and proper healthcare and grooming are essential for a happy life-long companion. If you would like to keep your costs and concerns down when purchasing a designer dog I suggest that you check its breeding history and do temperament tests as well as get them screened for certain common genetic disorders such as hip-dysplasia and retinal atrophy. Proper preparation and responsible habits lead to a great dog.

Gage Killian – pet enthusiast, web publisher
http://www.cockapoodog.info
http://www.puggleluv.com
http://www.caninefacts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gage_Killian

Oodles of Doodles! A peek at poodle crossbreeds

Oodles of Doodles! A peek at poodle crossbreeds

by D. Robert Williams

They’re called “crossbreeds”, “hybrids”, and sometimes simply “mutts”, but offspring of mixed canine heritage have the best qualities of their purebred parents–but are healthier and more robust.

Goldendoodles

A Goldendoodle (or Golden Doodle) is a product of breeding a golden retriever with a poodle. Goldendoodles were originally bred as the perfect pet for physically challenged people who needed an assistance dog that wouldn’t agitate their allergies. The Goldendoodle’s low shedding coat and high intelligence fit the bill, and has made them a family favorite since their appearance in United States in the mid 1990’s.

Smaller Goldendoodles are considered “Miniature”, and are the product of golden retriever and minature or toy poodle parents. Weights vary from 25 to 45 pounds, far smaller than the largest standard size Goldendoodles (from standard poodle lineage) which can weigh over 75 pounds.

Colors and coats vary widely, from cream to brown to black, with poodle curls or the shaggy retriever look. No matter what the look, all goldendoodles have that ever-important low shedding coat, a sharp mind and friendly temperament.

Labradoodles

Labradoodles are the product of labrador retriever and poodle parents, and have much in common with Goldendoodles. Like the Goldendoodle, Labradoodles were bred to be low-allergen guide dogs, originating in Australia in the early 1990’s.

There are three size categories for Labradoodles, depending on parentage, ranging from the 25-pound miniature to the 75+ pound standard, with medium Labradoodles at around 50 pounds. You will find Labradoodles in a wider range of colors than Goldendoodles: white, cream, tan, coffee, brown, red, grey, or black. Their coats are a little shorter at 3-4″, but the same varying texture.

Both of these poodle crossbreeds are remarkably fit, showing none of the major health concerns of their purebred parents, and a life expectancy of 13-15 years.

Other Poodle Crossbreeds

Hybrids from poodles of varying sizes include:

Schnoodle = Schnauzer + Poodle
Cockapoo = Cocker Spaniel + Poodle
Chi-Poo = Chihuahua + Poodle
Doodleman Pinscher = Doberman + Poodle
English Boodle = English Bulldog + Poodle
Eskapoo = American Eskimo Dog + Poodle
Lhasapoo = Lhasa Apso + Poodle
Pekepoo = Pekingese + Poodle
Pomapoo = Pomeranian + Poodle
Pugapoo = Pug + Poodle
Saint Berdoodle = Saint Bernard + Poodle
Schnoodle = Schnauzer + Poodle
Scoodle = Scottish Terrier + Poodle
Weimardoodle = Weimaraner + Poodle

Note: One crossbred pup left off this list is the popular and comical Puggle, which is often mistaken for a pug/poodle mix, but is actually the offspring of pug and beagle parents.

About the Author

Considering a goldendoodle or labradoodle? Search for breeders by location, breed, and dog size, then compare breeder prices and policies at: DoodleFinder http://www.doodlefinder.com – The online database of USA labradoodle and goldendoodle breeders.

Source: Article Search Engine: GoArticles.com

Non-Shedding Dog Breeds

Non-Shedding Dog Breeds

by Kirsten Hawkins

Many people would love to own a pet dog, but are wary of the potential mess that shed dog hair can cause in their homes. These people want a dog that doesn’t shed to be their companion. Unfortunately there is no such thing as a dog that doesn’t shed at all. All dogs will shed and replace at least some of their hair, just like people do. There are some breeds that shed far less than others, however, and selecting one of these breeds can keep the shedding mess to a minimum.

Airedale Terrier:

The Airedale terrier is a large terrier with a rough coat that sheds very little. These dogs can be good with children, but such socialization needs to start early in the dog’s life. They may play too roughly for small children. These are loyal and trainable dogs, but are also very naturally curious and not easily coaxed away from something that catches their interest. The Airedale usually grows to about 22-24 inches in height and a weight of 50-65 pounds.

Cockapoo:

The Cockapoo is reminiscent of the Poodle, especially in the face. It has a short, curly coat and does not shed much but does require above average grooming. It is actually a cross between the American Cocker Spaniel and the Poodle, hence its appearance and name (Cocker + Poodle = Cockapoo). These dogs are very friendly, loyal, and playful. They are good with children and other dogs and are typically very easy to train.

Italian Greyhound:

The Italian Greyhound is a miniature Greyhound. The body style of this dog is nearly exactly like that of his racing cousins, but in a convenient, compact size. These dogs are gentle and submissive. They become very emotionally attached to their people. They are obedient and easy to train, but prone to mischief – and they know when they’ve been naughty. They get along well with children – if the children are well behaved. If the kids are high strung and rambunctious, the dog will be too. It is best in a quiet household. The coat of the Italian Greyhound is short and sleek and they don’t shed much at all.

Miniature Poodle:

The Miniature Poodle is not truly a breed all to itself, but one of the three AKC recognized sizes of Poodles. Like all Poodles, they shed very little, but their short, curly coats require considerable grooming. They are very intelligent, playful, and quite trainable. They generally get along well with children, but they can be sensitive or nervous around rowdy kids. They easily integrate with a family and feel that they have to be a part of all family activities. They will often act as though they’ve been slighted if not included in family activities.

~~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

Kirsten Hawkins is a dog lover and animal expert from Nashville, TN. Visit http://www.doghealth411.com/ for more information on dog health, the care of dogs, and dog travel.

Source: Article Search Engine: GoArticles.com