Archive for the English Cocker Spaniel category

Cocker Spaniel – The Facts Every Owner of This Dog Breed Should Know

By Robert Benjamin

The American Cocker Spaniel was bred from the English Cocker Spaniel and is smaller than its English cousin. A Cocker Spaniel will average about 14 ½ to 15 ½ inches in height and 15 to 40 pounds in weight and will live 12 to 15 years. Cocker Spaniels have long silky coats that need to be brushed almost daily, but are considered average shedders. Cocker Spaniels like to run through the grass and woods and their coats will become tangled and matted. If this is not taken care of immediately by brushing the dirt and debris out, it could lead to some uncomfortable skin infections. Trimming the coat regularly is necessary and some owners prefer to keep the coat at a medium length.

Often called a ‘sweet’ dog, Cocker Spaniels make excellent family pets, due to their good nature. They love being with children and their family and often require minimal obedience training. In fact, formal obedience classes are not necessary with this dog as long as a few simple commands are taught and the master is consistent with using the training. However, training should not be skipped, as Cocker Spaniels can sometimes be stubborn. Cocker Spaniels are also described as ‘sensitive,’ so care should be exercised when correcting their behavior.

Cocker Spaniels can live in an apartment, provided they are exercised at least once a day. The Cocker Spaniel has long, floppy ears that require regular care and cleaning, preferably daily. These ears block air circulation, leaving the inner ears moist and prone to develop bacteria that can lead to infections. If the ears do become infected, it can be quite uncomfortable to the Cocker Spaniel, causing it to shake its head violently, which could cause small blood vessels to burst, resulting in a hematoma. While some owners pluck the hair out of the Cocker Spaniel’s ears, this is not advised as serum from the follicle could leak into the ear causing additional problems. The eyes also need regular cleaning to prevent infection.

Cocker Spaniels are prone to medical problems. Cocker Spaniels can develop progressive retinal atrophy, a genetic eye disease that causes blindness, heart problems, epilepsy, cataracts, glaucoma, hemophilia, and patellar luxation. Other concerns include hip dysplasia, ectropion, entropion, PRA, allergies, seborrhea, lip fold pyoderma, otitis externa, liver disease, urolithiasis, prolapse of nictitans gland, CHF, phosphofructokinase deficiency, cardiomyopathy, gastric torsion, elbow dysplasia and, IMHA (Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia).

There is a website that has great information on Cocker Spaniels and most other breeds of dogs. It has details that pertain to a dog breeds health, grooming, living conditions, best food choices and more, the website is called: Dog And Cat Facts, and can be found at this url:

http://www.dogandcatfacts.com

By Robert W. Benjamin

Copyright © 2007

You may publish this article in your ezine, newsletter, or on your web site as long as it is reprinted in its entirety and without modification except for formatting needs or grammar corrections.

Robert W. Benjamin has been in the software business on the internet for over 5 years, and has been producing low-cost software for the past 25+ years. He first released products on the AMIGA and C64 computer systems in the late 1970’s-80’s.

Stop The Fleas

http://www.stopthefleas.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Robert_Benjamin

The President’s Choice-A Cocker Spaniel

By Darin Hosking

The “Checkers speech” made the English and American breeds of Cocker Spaniels famous almost overnight. Richard Nixon made his famous speech on September 23, 1952. Being accused of taking a bribe, Nixon admitted receiving a Cocker Spaniel as a gift from a traveling salesmen. His daughter named the cocker spaniel “Checkers”.

Even though the AKC separates the English Cocker Spaniel and the American Cocker Spaniel breeds, the term Cocker Spaniel refers to two different breeds of dogs, both of which are simply called Cocker Spaniel in both of their countries of origin.

Other Facts About The English Cocker Spaniel:

The AKC designation is Sporting Dog Group. The Cocker Spaniel was first Registered by the AKC (American Kennel Club) in 1878.

Physical Characteristics:

The English Cocker Spaniel is an alert, compactly built, medium-sized dog with long ears, reaching at least to the nose when pulled forward. The breed has dark oval eyes with an intelligent expression. The hair is medium length. Other physical characteristics include:

* Broad muzzle with long full ears.
* Common color is liver and white.
* Other colors are noted such as red and white, black and white or deep brown

Size & Height:

* 24 to 28 pounds and stand
* 15 inches tall

Personality:

* High-energy dogs
* Loves brisk walks and game playing like Frisbee
* Flexible
* Easily trained
* Intelligence and
* Calm demeanor
* Some stubbornness because of their independent spirit
* This breed will not make a good guard dog

Physical Accommodations:

* Can survive well in an apartment
* Require daily exercise as an outlet for their pent up energy

Health Problems:

* Eye Infections
* Cataracts
* Glaucoma
* Ear infections are common

The English Cocker Spaniel is a happy, active dog. This breed is a favorite breed of dog lovers with children. The English Cocker Spaniels are friendly, affectionate and loyal. They do not make good guard dogs because their temperament is so open and friendly. They are open and friendly to strangers.

The Cocker Spaniel has made a name of itself in the history of our country. Presidents and dignitaries all over the world love this affable breed. It might be because of the constant tail wagging that displays their joy of just being around people. These dogs make great companions for anyone who wants a real ego boost when they walk through the front door.

Animaroo provides in depth information on dog breeds, puppies for sale, and includes photos, traits of specific dog breed, and common health issues. For Information on finding and living with the Cocker Spaniel – visit:

http://www.animaroo.com/puppies/Cocker_Spaniel_Puppies_For_Sale.html

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Darin_Hosking

The English Cocker Spaniel: Game Bird Dog

The English Cocker Spaniel: Game Bird Dog

By Michael Russell

The traditional sport of hunting the “gamecock” is the foundation of the word “Cocker”. The term “Cocker” denotes those spaniels which were used for hunting this bird. Many years ago hunting dogs were classified according to size. Those over 25 pounds were classified as Field Spaniels and those under 25 pounds were classified generally as Cocker Spaniels. Selective breeding of Spaniels and other hunting breeds in the nineteenth century began to distinguish and discriminate between the different types of Spaniels.

The Cocker spaniel was classified as a separate breed by the English Kennel club in 1892 and by 1946 in the United States two different “Cockers” were classified, the American Cocker spaniel and the English Cocker Spaniel. The two breeds diverged in several ways. the English Cocker is notably the dog which retains a strong hunting instinct. The muzzle of the English Cocker is longer with less stop than that of the American Cocker Spaniel. The body is square, in contrast to the American Cocker which presents a sloping back and exaggerated rear angulation.

The English cocker is essentially a hunting dog and the form reflects the function. The English Cocker’s body should present well sprung ribs for endurance in the field and a steady gait which is balanced and not overly “flashy” as is the picture which is presented by the American Cocker Spaniel’s exaggerated movement. The tail is docked and the tail set of the English Cocker is slightly lower than that of the American Cocker, another important distinction between the two breeds. The coat is longer and this can present a difficulty in the field, regular grooming and some trimming is necessary for neatness. The Spaniel ear is always long and heavily feathered, the hairs on the ear being much longer than the ear leather itself. The long drooping ears of the typical Spaniel are said to act as a means of sweeping the scent forward towards the muzzle when the dog is hunting.

When hunting the English Cocker is a steady and reliable hunter, aggressive and thorough. Its small size allows it to get into the thickets and brambles with ease and scare up the birds. The movement of the cocker should be long and reaching, with incessant tail action. It is typically a flushing dog, although it can be useful also as a retriever.

Both Cockers have a merry disposition and happy character, however the English Cocker appears most often to have a more solid and stable disposition, less stubborn in nature and easily trained. This is a smart dog which is inquisitive by nature and should have no timidity. The dog is an eager hunter and very trainable, a faithful dog who works for his master as a companion and partner in the field and prefers the human companionship to that of other dogs. The English Cocker does not make a good kennel dog, needing to be with people is part of its nature and it is a reliable and affectionate pet and strong and capable hunting companion.

Michael Russell

Your Independent guide to Dogs

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Russell

The English Cocker Spaniel: Game Bird Dog

The English Cocker Spaniel: Game Bird Dog

By Michael Russell

The traditional sport of hunting the “gamecock” is the foundation of the word “Cocker”. The term “Cocker” denotes those spaniels which were used for hunting this bird. Many years ago hunting dogs were classified according to size. Those over 25 pounds were classified as Field Spaniels and those under 25 pounds were classified generally as Cocker Spaniels. Selective breeding of Spaniels and other hunting breeds in the nineteenth century began to distinguish and discriminate between the different types of Spaniels.

The Cocker spaniel was classified as a separate breed by the English Kennel club in 1892 and by 1946 in the United States two different “Cockers” were classified, the American Cocker spaniel and the English Cocker Spaniel. The two breeds diverged in several ways. the English Cocker is notably the dog which retains a strong hunting instinct. The muzzle of the English Cocker is longer with less stop than that of the American Cocker Spaniel. The body is square, in contrast to the American Cocker which presents a sloping back and exaggerated rear angulation.

The English cocker is essentially a hunting dog and the form reflects the function. The English Cocker’s body should present well sprung ribs for endurance in the field and a steady gait which is balanced and not overly “flashy” as is the picture which is presented by the American Cocker Spaniel’s exaggerated movement. The tail is docked and the tail set of the English Cocker is slightly lower than that of the American Cocker, another important distinction between the two breeds. The coat is longer and this can present a difficulty in the field, regular grooming and some trimming is necessary for neatness. The Spaniel ear is always long and heavily feathered, the hairs on the ear being much longer than the ear leather itself. The long drooping ears of the typical Spaniel are said to act as a means of sweeping the scent forward towards the muzzle when the dog is hunting.

When hunting the English Cocker is a steady and reliable hunter, aggressive and thorough. Its small size allows it to get into the thickets and brambles with ease and scare up the birds. The movement of the cocker should be long and reaching, with incessant tail action. It is typically a flushing dog, although it can be useful also as a retriever.

Both Cockers have a merry disposition and happy character, however the English Cocker appears most often to have a more solid and stable disposition, less stubborn in nature and easily trained. This is a smart dog which is inquisitive by nature and should have no timidity. The dog is an eager hunter and very trainable, a faithful dog who works for his master as a companion and partner in the field and prefers the human companionship to that of other dogs. The English Cocker does not make a good kennel dog, needing to be with people is part of its nature and it is a reliable and affectionate pet and strong and capable hunting companion.

Michael Russell

Your Independent guide to Dogs

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Russell