Archive for the Lakeland Terrier category

The Terrier Breeds

Terriers are among the most diverse breeds, ranging from the tiny toy Yorkie to the large Airedale. Originally developed to hunt and trap small game, the group has largely changed its role in human life over the past 200 years. But the wide range of size, temperament and appearance has caused terriers to continue to be among the most popular group in the world.

Even within a single subset, such as the smaller breeds, variety is everywhere with terriers. Jack Russells look and behave very differently from Westies. A Scottie and a Yorkie are roughly the same size, but have very different attitudes in detail, while still retaining many general terrier characteristics.

Medium-sized terriers, such as the American Staffordshire Terrier and the Welsh Terrier could hardly look more different. To the novice, it would be hard to find reasons to put them into the same category. Yet both have similar lineage, being developed not far from one another by modern measurements of distance.

Larger terriers look still more different from their smaller cousins. The Airedale, the Lakeland Terrier and the Irish Terrier are much more similar to one another, in appearance and behavior, than they are to the smaller breeds. Yet, a Kerry Blue – while much larger than the Scottie – was bred in similar circumstances and show common behaviors. That shows in the stance, the coat and other attributes, such as their high spirits and able mountain herding ability.

These are all very different from others that carry the terrier name. The Border Terrier resembles a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, even though the former is quite a bit taller. Both have the same square head, close coat and highly alert nature. Yet, you could hardly find two terriers more closely related, while looking dissimilar, than the Smooth Fox Terrier and the Wire-Haired Fox.

This ‘similarity within diversity’ is no accident, of course. Originally bred to hunt, many breeds were narrowed to perform that service for a group of prey that is equally varied. Fox and rabbit are similar enough to be hunted by the same breed. But animals that live above ground, such as tree squirrels, require a different technique.

That variation took on even larger dimensions as the generations went by and hunting became much less common. Everything from sports contests to film production, from watchdog and drug-sniffing duty to Border Patrol has called terriers into action. Breeding a dog to perform services for the deaf is naturally going to take a very different turn from one who will simply be a family pet.

Tastes in terriers run as wide a range as the breeds. Some like the portability and cute look of a little Westie. Others will find their hearts stolen by a miniature schnauzer, with their floppy ears and quizzical look. Still others can’t resist the sweet good nature of an Airedale and enjoy their tall, proud stance and beautiful appearance.

But whether one’s taste runs to the Manchester, looking a lot like a Doberman, or preference is for the tiny Norfolk, there’s a terrier just right for you.

Lakeland Terrier Puppy And Dog Information

By: Mitch Endick

The Lakeland Terrier is a happy dog that makes a great pet. They can be kept in an apartment as long as they can be walked frequently. They do best in a properly fenced in yard for exercise but remember that they are diggers so pay attention to possibly burying some of the fence. They need to be extensively socialized to get along with other pets. They generally love older, considerate children. As a reminder, never leave a child unsupervised with a puppy or dog.

*Approximate Adult Size. The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the Lakeland Terrier is 13 to 15 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and about 17 pounds for the male and about 15 pounds for the female.

*Special Health Considerations. Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Lakeland Terrier is no exception. Although considered to be a very hardy breed, be on the look out for cataracts and lens luxation. This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.

She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian yearly for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.

*Grooming. The Lakeland Terrier has a double coat of soft inner and wiry hard outer hair. They may need loose hair plucked from the ear passages. The pads of their feet may also need to be trimmed. Their dead hair needs to be plucked several times a years and this is best done by a professional groomer.

Her ears should be checked once a week and be kept clean. If you have her professionally groomed, make sure ear cleaning and inspection is part of the package. No water or excess fluid should get in the dogs ears, and do not try to irrigate the ears. Ear cleaning is too complicated and critical to instruct here. Look for hair growing in the ear canal, excess wax, or moisture. If her ears have a discharge, foul odor or she seems to be in distress and you suspect an infection, or tumor, consult your veterinarian.

Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.

Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet. Generally a guillotine type trimmer is the best for this chore and competent instructions to accomplish this can be found on the net.

*Life Span. The Lakeland Terrier can live between 12 and 16 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.

*History. The Lakeland Terrier comes from England where they were bred to hunt vermin. They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1934.

Some Registries:
*United States Lakeland Terrier Club
*UKC United Kennel Club
*NKC National Kennel Club
*CKC Continental Kennel Club
*APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.
*AKC American Kennel Club
*FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale
*NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club
*KCGB = Kennel Club of Great Britain
*ANKC = Australian National Kennel Club
*ACR = American Canine Registry

Litter Size: 3 to 5 Lakeland Terrier puppies

Category: Terrier

Terms To Describe: Hardy, brave, sturdy, friendly, confident, alert, graceful, bold

*SPECIAL GOOD POINTS
Good watch dog.
Generally love children.
Loving and affectionate pet.

*SPECIAL BAD POINTS
Poor guard dog.
Can be a digger.
They can be barkers.
Can be difficult to house break.
Can be willful.

*Other Names Known By: Cumberland Terrier

*Every dog is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

Mitch Endick is a short article writer, editor and website developer for the popular pet site petpages.com. www.petpages.com is a pet information site with free pet ads, dog classifieds, and puppy for sale info Petpages.com also offers information on cats, fish, reptiles, birds, ferrets, rabbits, mice and even pet bugs.