Archive for the Schnauzer category

Dog breed comparison: What to look for when choosing a family pet

By Sarah Freeland

With so many different dog breeds available, how can you know which dog is right the right pet for you and your family? There are so many things to take into consideration when selecting a puppy including size, behavior, health concerns, compatibility with other pets and children, temperament and grooming requirements. Here we have outlined a few common dog breeds to help you find the dog that is best for you and your family’s specific needs and lifestyle.

German Wirehaired Pointer

The German Wirehaired Pointer is known by a lot of different names including Deutscher Drahthaariger, Vorstehund, German Pointer, and Drahthaar. This German breed was first developed at the end of the 19th century as a hunting dog. This breed was created by crossing several dog breeds including Terriers, German Shorthaired Pointers, Foxhounds and Poodles. Today this breed is used as both a sporting dog and as a family dog.

Pekingese

The Pekingese, also called the Lion Dog and the Peking Palasthund, is a Chinese toy breed. Their ancestry can be traced back 1500 years. They were originally developed as a palace dog. Today this breed is very popular as a show dog, as a companion dog, and as a family dog.

The Pekingese is a tiny little dog that stands between 6 and 9 inches tall and weighs between 7 and 12 pounds. They have a long double coat that comes in a variety of colors and patters. They are a great companion dog, however, they don’t get along well with little children. They can be a bit grouchy if you try to wake them up when they are sleeping so they are best suited for quieter homes.

The German Wire Haired Pointer stands between 22 and 26 inches tall and usually weighs between 45 and 75 pounds. Their coat is short, thick, and harsh. It comes in solid colors as well as multi-colors. The most common coat colors associated with this breed include liver, black, and white.

Standard Schnauzer

The Standard Schnauzer, also called the Mittelschnauzer, is a German non-sporting breed. They stand between 17.5 and 19.5 inches tall and they weigh between 26 and 40 pounds. They have the typical Schnauzer coat that is short, harsh, and wiry. They come in salt and pepper, solid black, and black and silver color variations. This is a very affectionate and tolerant dog that makes a great companion for kids and adults.

Ibizan Hound

The Ibizan Hound, also referred to as the Podenco Ibicenco, the Ca Eibisenc, and the Balaeric Dog, is a Spanish breed. Its origins can be traced back to Egypt around 3400 B.C. when this dog’s ancestors were used as hunting dogs. Today they are used for both hunting and companionship.

The Ibizan Hound is a tall slender dog that stands between 22.5 and 27.5 inches tall and weighs between 42 and 55 pounds. They have a short, smooth or rough, dense coat that comes in white, lion, chestnut brown, or multi-color. This dog has a great temperament for family life, and they can be trained to get along with small pets. Some of the health issues that plague this breed include pesticide sensitivities and reproductive issues.

Scottish Terrier

The Scottish Terrier, also called a Scotty Dog or an Aberdeen Terrier, is a terrier that originated in Scotland. They were originally bred as vermin hunters. They are a short stature dog that only stands between 10 and 11 inches tall and weighs between 19 and 23 pounds. They have a medium length wiry coat that comes in black, brindle, and wheaten.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sarah_Freeland

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

By Steve Allison

Although the concept is by no means new; many people are discovering that some of the latest breeds of super dogs are not as great as their breeders would have you believe.

Of the “designer dog club” the ‘Labradoodle’ is probably the most well known. The ‘Labradoodle’ was originally bred for sight impaired individuals who had severe reactions to dog’s fur. This new hybrid aimed to combine the intelligence of the Labrador with a non-shedding poodle. However you may or may not have a puppy that will be non-shedding. Labradoodles have been around for over 20 years and are gaining recognition.

But the term ‘designer mutts’ can be used to describe any number of endless combinations of dogs who have been bred for particular valued qualities. Ever thought about owning a Dorgi? That’s a cross between a Corgi and a Dachshund. How about a Puggle? That’s a cross between a Beagle and a Puggle. There are many variations on breeds with poodles now too. This often results in comical names – the Corgi Poo; or the Shih Poo, the variations are endless.

Hypoallergenic, intelligent and some say healthier than average – these dogs are becoming popular throughout the world. Yet the American Kennel Club refuses to accept these new breeds. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes 153 breeds at present; and says that these dogs don’t meet their criteria.

The American Hybrid Club seems to be the answer for the breeders who are rallying to have their new combinations recognized. They argue that in fact all dog breeds exist as a result of some kind of experimentation with mixing breeds.

There are many inherent dangers associated with mixing breeds that would never have bred naturally. The main problem is that you never really know exactly what you will be getting. Most often you can learn a great deal about a dog by the look and temperament of their parents – but with these dogs there is no way to tell if you will end up with a mouse sized dog – or a dog the size of a small donkey.

And it’s not just looks. You might be unpleasantly surprised to find that your new puppy has the temperament of a hostile dictator; or worse is very aggressive. These are serious faults; especially if you intend to introduce your cute new ‘Schnoodle’ (a mixture of a Schnauzer and a poodle) to your kids you never know what might happen.

Is that really a chance you want to take?

Also, these new breeds are by no means considered cheap. You could get an equivalent mix at a shelter for free. But some breeders are charging thousands of dollars for dogs they cannot personally guarantee. They claim these dogs take the best of both breeds. But there is an equal risk that the dog can end up with the worst from breeds. This seems like a staggering chance to take.

In an attempt to create super dog these breeders are using breeding techniques that seem strangely unnatural. Certain Bulldog combinations always require artificial insemination for successful mating to occur. And you can’t count on Caesar section. Many of the crossbreeds are bred for profit. Unscrupulous practices which lead to fashion item dogs will create a host of problems for future generations.

If you have your heart set on a designer dog bear in mind you might end up paying more in vet bills. Your puppy will need a vast array of tests.

There are many well-established variations. Purebred dogs have a proven track record. You can say with greater certainty what your Labrador will look like. You will also have a greater idea of what kinds of health problems to expect in your Dachshund.

You can also find adult crossbreeds in a number of places. Adult dogs are often a good choice for families who have children or who need to be sure of the dog’s temperament. And of course giving a loving home to a homeless dog is always a good thing. If you have your heart set on one of the new crossbreeds; try to learn what you can before deciding on the particular dog or cross.

Steve Allison is a third generation of professional dog breeders along with his brother Gary. It all started with his grandparents in 1970 with the Boston Terriers and has expanded to Maltese, Yorkshire Terriers, Pugs, Shih Tzu’s and Pomeranians. He is also actively involved with dog rescue and has a website that showcases the puppies they occasionally has for sale at All My Puppies Online Steve is also the co-author of two consumer guides, Carpet Secrets and Moving Secrets Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steve_Allison

Schnauzer Complete Profile

Schnauzer Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Schnauzer Standard

Key Facts:

Size: Medium
Height: 45 – 50 cm (18 – 20 inches)
Weight: 14.5 – 15.5 kg (32 – 34 lb)
Life Span: 14 years
Grooming: Straightforward
Exercise: Medium
Feeding: Medium
Temperament: Alert & reliable
Country of Origin: Germany
AKC Group: Working
Other Names: Standard Schnauzer, Mittelschnauzer

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Rugged, robust and squarely-built.
Colour: Salt and pepper or solid black.
Coat: The outer coat is wiry and harsh and the under coat is soft and dense.
Tail: Set high and customarily docked.
Ears: Set high, V-shaped with the tips dropping forward towards the temple. In some countries they can be cropped and carried erect.
Body: The chest is moderately wide and the back is short. The belly is slightly raised and the shoulders are flat and muscular.

Temperament:
Fearless, protective, lively, affectionate, intelligent, observant and spirited. Schnauzers are dependable dogs that learn quickly and are eager pupils. They do have a stubborn side, but will respond well to fair and consistent training. They make good watch dogs and guard dogs as they are naturally distrusting of people they do not know. Schnauzers get along well with other dogs and household pets and are very tolerant of children.

Grooming:
The coat of the Schnauzer needs to be plucked by hand at least twice a year. Plucking is necessary with most wire-haired breeds as it is the only way to keep both the coat and skin in it’s best condition. The excess hair between the pads of the feet should be clipped and the loose hair in the ear canals should be removed. The beard, moustache and eyebrows need regular combing to prevent tangles. The advantage with these dogs is that they shed little or no hair and don’t tend to have a dog odour.

Exercise:
Schnauzers need an average amount of exercise, but they like to be busy and kept occupied. Suitable activities for these dogs include, swimming, running alongside a cycle (once fully grown), agility skills, fly-ball, playing in the garden and running in the woods. If their exercise needs are met, then they should be quite peaceful and calm.

History:
It is believed that Schnauzers evolved from German Wirehaired pinschers, black poodles and a spitz-like grey dog. They date back to the 15th and 16th centuries when they were used for herding, ratting and guarding. These dogs were once known as the Schnauzer-Pinscher.

Additional Comments:

Schnauzers need firm training and early socialization with a variety of people and animals to help prevent them becoming overly protective and dominant.

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