Archive for the Schnoodle category

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

By Steve Allison

Although the concept is by no means new; many people are discovering that some of the latest breeds of super dogs are not as great as their breeders would have you believe.

Of the “designer dog club” the ‘Labradoodle’ is probably the most well known. The ‘Labradoodle’ was originally bred for sight impaired individuals who had severe reactions to dog’s fur. This new hybrid aimed to combine the intelligence of the Labrador with a non-shedding poodle. However you may or may not have a puppy that will be non-shedding. Labradoodles have been around for over 20 years and are gaining recognition.

But the term ‘designer mutts’ can be used to describe any number of endless combinations of dogs who have been bred for particular valued qualities. Ever thought about owning a Dorgi? That’s a cross between a Corgi and a Dachshund. How about a Puggle? That’s a cross between a Beagle and a Puggle. There are many variations on breeds with poodles now too. This often results in comical names – the Corgi Poo; or the Shih Poo, the variations are endless.

Hypoallergenic, intelligent and some say healthier than average – these dogs are becoming popular throughout the world. Yet the American Kennel Club refuses to accept these new breeds. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes 153 breeds at present; and says that these dogs don’t meet their criteria.

The American Hybrid Club seems to be the answer for the breeders who are rallying to have their new combinations recognized. They argue that in fact all dog breeds exist as a result of some kind of experimentation with mixing breeds.

There are many inherent dangers associated with mixing breeds that would never have bred naturally. The main problem is that you never really know exactly what you will be getting. Most often you can learn a great deal about a dog by the look and temperament of their parents – but with these dogs there is no way to tell if you will end up with a mouse sized dog – or a dog the size of a small donkey.

And it’s not just looks. You might be unpleasantly surprised to find that your new puppy has the temperament of a hostile dictator; or worse is very aggressive. These are serious faults; especially if you intend to introduce your cute new ‘Schnoodle’ (a mixture of a Schnauzer and a poodle) to your kids you never know what might happen.

Is that really a chance you want to take?

Also, these new breeds are by no means considered cheap. You could get an equivalent mix at a shelter for free. But some breeders are charging thousands of dollars for dogs they cannot personally guarantee. They claim these dogs take the best of both breeds. But there is an equal risk that the dog can end up with the worst from breeds. This seems like a staggering chance to take.

In an attempt to create super dog these breeders are using breeding techniques that seem strangely unnatural. Certain Bulldog combinations always require artificial insemination for successful mating to occur. And you can’t count on Caesar section. Many of the crossbreeds are bred for profit. Unscrupulous practices which lead to fashion item dogs will create a host of problems for future generations.

If you have your heart set on a designer dog bear in mind you might end up paying more in vet bills. Your puppy will need a vast array of tests.

There are many well-established variations. Purebred dogs have a proven track record. You can say with greater certainty what your Labrador will look like. You will also have a greater idea of what kinds of health problems to expect in your Dachshund.

You can also find adult crossbreeds in a number of places. Adult dogs are often a good choice for families who have children or who need to be sure of the dog’s temperament. And of course giving a loving home to a homeless dog is always a good thing. If you have your heart set on one of the new crossbreeds; try to learn what you can before deciding on the particular dog or cross.

Steve Allison is a third generation of professional dog breeders along with his brother Gary. It all started with his grandparents in 1970 with the Boston Terriers and has expanded to Maltese, Yorkshire Terriers, Pugs, Shih Tzu’s and Pomeranians. He is also actively involved with dog rescue and has a website that showcases the puppies they occasionally has for sale at All My Puppies Online Steve is also the co-author of two consumer guides, Carpet Secrets and Moving Secrets Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steve_Allison

Puggle Dogs and Designer Dog Facts – The Truth About Puggles

Puggle Dogs and Designer Dog Facts – The Truth About Puggles

By Jenny Smith

Puggle Dogs are a fairly new mixed breed. They’re a half breed combined with a pug and a beagle. They are one of the cutest mix breed dogs out there today. They have a very mellow, loving temperament. Puggles are ideal family pets, because they do so well with young children. They’re all around lovable, and not normally a one person dog as are pugs. Puggles become attached to anyone that will give them the time of day and feed them. This breed is also very easily trained. This makes it great for that always terrible training period in a young pups life.

Anyone that has experienced raising a dog from infancy knows that you go through a period of potty training. Some dogs are better than others during this stage. Some breeds are very easily trained and you never have much of a problem with them, while others are not always so. Puggles learn to obey commands well, while many breeds never seem to grasp this key concept. This makes the chewing stage a little more easy to cope with as well. They will most certainly go through that chewing stage like any puppy, but they seem to learn the word “no” very well, and obey commands earlier than most.

Puggles don’t posses the eye’s that pop out or the completely flat noses that make breathing often times difficult for the pug. They seem to be the perfect cross between two dogs with several flaws. They also don’t have the miserable howl, like beagles do. They’ve got the perfect combination of good looks and great characteristics. All this combined is the ingredients of the perfect companion. There are so many breeds of dog out there today, that it can be hard to choose the one for you. As time goes on there is continually more and more breeds being discovered and created. The first known breed of dogs stemmed primarily from the wolf in the northwest region. In Egypt one of the first dogs was the basenji. The basenji is a compact hunter whose ancestry is depicted in Egyptian tombs dating around 5,000 years old. The interesting thing about this dog is that it doesn’t bark. It makes little chortles and yodels, and snarls. This dog, like the wolf can only be bred once a year. Most dogs can be bred twice a year. Here are a few of the older breeds known to man;

• Saluki
• Afghan Hound
• St Bernard
• Alaskan Malamute
• Lhasa Apso

Many modern day cross breed dogs stemmed from one or more of these older dogs. After these dogs came some more breeds that pushed the evolution of dogs a litter further. They are as follows;

• Miniature Poodle
• Pembroke Welsh Corgi
• Mountain Cur
• Australian Shepherd

And so began the cross bred dog. Some say that cross breed dogs are not a good thing. They believe that these designer dogs are a fashion statement to many. In turn, this excludes all other breeds from having homes. The majority of people nowadays want some sort of cross breed. Whether it be a puggle (pug & beagle mix), a labradoodle (Labrador retriever & Poodle mix), or a Schnoodle (Miniature Schnauzer-Poodle mix). Many dog owners argue that these mixed breeds aren’t a real breed, merely overpriced mutts. Many press the point that before you go buying a designer dog to go down to the local shelter and see what’s available. Although these mixed breed dogs are adorable, you don’t always have to pay that designer price. Often times these mixed breeds can be found at shelters as well, and for less than half the price! There are hundreds to thousands of dogs each year that are homeless, and are taken to these animal shelters in hopes of finding homes for them. Just because they aren’t a purebred mix doesn’t mean they won’t be the best companion ever! The puggle is a recognized purebred mix.

A man by the name of Gary Garner is the president of the American Canine Hybrid Club. His company offers certificates of authentication for a mere price of $20. These are available to anyone who can prove that they are owners of the offspring of two different breed purebred dogs. He gets letters upon letters of hate mail coming from many purebred owners. Although this seems to angry many, hundreds are getting this done every day.

The best piece of advice for anyone considering getting a dog as a pet, is to do the research. Research each dog you think you may want, and compare them to one another. Here are a few key things to consider when shopping for the breed that’s right for you:

• Size?
• Easily trainable?
• Shedding? (little, average, constant.)
• Coat? (Wire, thick, long, short, etc.)
• Grooming? (weekly, daily, moderate.)
• Aggressive characteristics?
• Family dog?
• Good with everyone, or one man dog?
• Common characteristic habits with this breed?
• Health issues common to breed?

Many celebrities have taken a liking to the puggle as well. Here are a few new owners of the breed; Jake Gyllenhaal, James Gandolfini, Sylvester Stallone and Julianne Moore. Anyone who discovers this new furry friend can’t control the urge to get one of their own. Time to get out there and find the perfect breed for you! Oh wait, you already found it…….The PUGGLE!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jenny_Smith

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

By Steve Allison

Although the concept is by no means new; many people are discovering that some of the latest breeds of super dogs are not as great as their breeders would have you believe.

Of the “designer dog club” the ‘Labradoodle’ is probably the most well known. The ‘Labradoodle’ was originally bred for sight impaired individuals who had severe reactions to dog’s fur. This new hybrid aimed to combine the intelligence of the Labrador with a non-shedding poodle. However you may or may not have a puppy that will be non-shedding. Labradoodles have been around for over 20 years and are gaining recognition.

But the term ‘designer mutts’ can be used to describe any number of endless combinations of dogs who have been bred for particular valued qualities. Ever thought about owning a Dorgi? That’s a cross between a Corgi and a Dachshund. How about a Puggle? That’s a cross between a Beagle and a Puggle. There are many variations on breeds with poodles now too. This often results in comical names – the Corgi Poo; or the Shih Poo, the variations are endless.

Hypoallergenic, intelligent and some say healthier than average – these dogs are becoming popular throughout the world. Yet the American Kennel Club refuses to accept these new breeds. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes 153 breeds at present; and says that these dogs don’t meet their criteria.

The American Hybrid Club seems to be the answer for the breeders who are rallying to have their new combinations recognized. They argue that in fact all dog breeds exist as a result of some kind of experimentation with mixing breeds.

There are many inherent dangers associated with mixing breeds that would never have bred naturally. The main problem is that you never really know exactly what you will be getting. Most often you can learn a great deal about a dog by the look and temperament of their parents – but with these dogs there is no way to tell if you will end up with a mouse sized dog – or a dog the size of a small donkey.

And it’s not just looks. You might be unpleasantly surprised to find that your new puppy has the temperament of a hostile dictator; or worse is very aggressive. These are serious faults; especially if you intend to introduce your cute new ‘Schnoodle’ (a mixture of a Schnauzer and a poodle) to your kids you never know what might happen.

Is that really a chance you want to take?

Also, these new breeds are by no means considered cheap. You could get an equivalent mix at a shelter for free. But some breeders are charging thousands of dollars for dogs they cannot personally guarantee. They claim these dogs take the best of both breeds. But there is an equal risk that the dog can end up with the worst from breeds. This seems like a staggering chance to take.

In an attempt to create super dog these breeders are using breeding techniques that seem strangely unnatural. Certain Bulldog combinations always require artificial insemination for successful mating to occur. And you can’t count on Caesar section. Many of the crossbreeds are bred for profit. Unscrupulous practices which lead to fashion item dogs will create a host of problems for future generations.

If you have your heart set on a designer dog bear in mind you might end up paying more in vet bills. Your puppy will need a vast array of tests.

There are many well-established variations. Purebred dogs have a proven track record. You can say with greater certainty what your Labrador will look like. You will also have a greater idea of what kinds of health problems to expect in your Dachshund.

You can also find adult crossbreeds in a number of places. Adult dogs are often a good choice for families who have children or who need to be sure of the dog’s temperament. And of course giving a loving home to a homeless dog is always a good thing. If you have your heart set on one of the new crossbreeds; try to learn what you can before deciding on the particular dog or cross.

Steve Allison is a third generation of professional dog breeders along with his brother Gary. It all started with his grandparents in 1970 with the Boston Terriers and has expanded to Maltese, Yorkshire Terriers, Pugs, Shih Tzu’s and Pomeranians. He is also actively involved with dog rescue and has a website that showcases the puppies they occasionally has for sale at All My Puppies Online Steve is also the co-author of two consumer guides, Carpet Secrets and Moving Secrets Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steve_Allison

“Designer” or Mixed Breed Dogs

“Designer” or Mixed Breed Dogs

By Gage Killian

Designer dogs are the up and coming rage among Hollywood and dog lovers alike. Dogs like the puggle (pug + beagle), the cockapoo aka cockerpoo or spoodle(cocker-spaniel + poodle), the labradoodle (Labrador retriever + poodle), the peekapoo (pekingnese + poodle) and the Schnoodle (Schnauzer + Poodle) are growing ever more popular today than ever before. Why are these “mutts” so big right now?

1. Cute Names – Designer dogs have cute names that people love and make the appearance of a new breed of dog that very few have heard of. For example: the puggle.

2. Great for those with allergies – Unlike some purebred dogs, designer dogs are often bred to reduce the amount of allergens they produce by not having an undercoat.

3. Sheds less – Some designer dogs are bred to shed less than other dogs.

4. Genetic advantage – Believed to be less prone to inbreeding, the designer dog is thought to have better temperaments and also thought to be smarter and more trainable than their purebred counter parts.

Controversy surrounding these dogs have made purebred dog owners enraged. It’s bad for there business and the qualities listed above only hold true in specific cases. The designer dog fad has also had its fallbacks.

1. Bad breeding – bad breeding leads to unwanted dogs. Many people want to produce a designer dog without doing back-ground checks and without the skills needed to do so.

2. Bad owners – Some believe that just because they bought a designer dog means that they don’t need to train, care for or love their pet as much. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Designer dogs need just as much care and attention as all other dogs do, if not more.

3. More expensive – the price for these dogs have sky-rocketed sometimes hit the $1,000 mark. Sometimes its better just to go to the humane society or animal shelter and find a perfectly fine dog. The shots and care for these dogs can make their prices higher as well.

Don’t get me wrong, these are wonderful pets. However, they need wonderful owners as well. Love and care and proper healthcare and grooming are essential for a happy life-long companion. If you would like to keep your costs and concerns down when purchasing a designer dog I suggest that you check its breeding history and do temperament tests as well as get them screened for certain common genetic disorders such as hip-dysplasia and retinal atrophy. Proper preparation and responsible habits lead to a great dog.

Gage Killian – pet enthusiast, web publisher
http://www.cockapoodog.info
http://www.puggleluv.com
http://www.caninefacts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gage_Killian

Oodles of Doodles! A peek at poodle crossbreeds

Oodles of Doodles! A peek at poodle crossbreeds

by D. Robert Williams

They’re called “crossbreeds”, “hybrids”, and sometimes simply “mutts”, but offspring of mixed canine heritage have the best qualities of their purebred parents–but are healthier and more robust.

Goldendoodles

A Goldendoodle (or Golden Doodle) is a product of breeding a golden retriever with a poodle. Goldendoodles were originally bred as the perfect pet for physically challenged people who needed an assistance dog that wouldn’t agitate their allergies. The Goldendoodle’s low shedding coat and high intelligence fit the bill, and has made them a family favorite since their appearance in United States in the mid 1990’s.

Smaller Goldendoodles are considered “Miniature”, and are the product of golden retriever and minature or toy poodle parents. Weights vary from 25 to 45 pounds, far smaller than the largest standard size Goldendoodles (from standard poodle lineage) which can weigh over 75 pounds.

Colors and coats vary widely, from cream to brown to black, with poodle curls or the shaggy retriever look. No matter what the look, all goldendoodles have that ever-important low shedding coat, a sharp mind and friendly temperament.

Labradoodles

Labradoodles are the product of labrador retriever and poodle parents, and have much in common with Goldendoodles. Like the Goldendoodle, Labradoodles were bred to be low-allergen guide dogs, originating in Australia in the early 1990’s.

There are three size categories for Labradoodles, depending on parentage, ranging from the 25-pound miniature to the 75+ pound standard, with medium Labradoodles at around 50 pounds. You will find Labradoodles in a wider range of colors than Goldendoodles: white, cream, tan, coffee, brown, red, grey, or black. Their coats are a little shorter at 3-4″, but the same varying texture.

Both of these poodle crossbreeds are remarkably fit, showing none of the major health concerns of their purebred parents, and a life expectancy of 13-15 years.

Other Poodle Crossbreeds

Hybrids from poodles of varying sizes include:

Schnoodle = Schnauzer + Poodle
Cockapoo = Cocker Spaniel + Poodle
Chi-Poo = Chihuahua + Poodle
Doodleman Pinscher = Doberman + Poodle
English Boodle = English Bulldog + Poodle
Eskapoo = American Eskimo Dog + Poodle
Lhasapoo = Lhasa Apso + Poodle
Pekepoo = Pekingese + Poodle
Pomapoo = Pomeranian + Poodle
Pugapoo = Pug + Poodle
Saint Berdoodle = Saint Bernard + Poodle
Schnoodle = Schnauzer + Poodle
Scoodle = Scottish Terrier + Poodle
Weimardoodle = Weimaraner + Poodle

Note: One crossbred pup left off this list is the popular and comical Puggle, which is often mistaken for a pug/poodle mix, but is actually the offspring of pug and beagle parents.

About the Author

Considering a goldendoodle or labradoodle? Search for breeders by location, breed, and dog size, then compare breeder prices and policies at: DoodleFinder http://www.doodlefinder.com – The online database of USA labradoodle and goldendoodle breeders.

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