Posts Tagged German Shepherd

German Shepherds – The Working Dog

German Shepherds were bred over 100 years ago specifically to work at herding sheep. They’ve been earning their keep ever since. Shepherds have served as guide dogs, bomb or drug sniffing dogs and more. They’re the very image of a police dog. They’ve proven themselves in these roles and many more.

Training begins early in life. Barely weaned, German Shepherd puppies begin simple ‘sit, stay, heel’ exercises, much as any other breed. But they quickly graduate to much more complex duties. Obstacle course work, location and sniffing exercises and much more are not far behind.

To train a guide dog for the blind, for example, takes years of effort on the part of the dog and the trainer. An hour or more per day, often as much as four, will be required to mold their natural instincts to the desired purpose.

German Shepherds are strong, intelligent, agile and adaptable. But it takes specific exercises, learned over many months, to open a door, fetch a tray without spilling and perform other tasks. Those who assist people in wheelchairs have to act as the arms and legs of those who can’t use their own. For a dog, even one as intelligent and hard-working as a German Shepherd, that takes lots of practice.

Guide dogs for the blind need to halt at street corners, then go at the proper time, without fear or distraction. In busy cities there are plenty of things to go wrong. Yet, how often do you hear of a guide dog leading their companion astray? That skill was acquired over months of training, work that is always ongoing.

Even guard dogs have much more difficult tasks than simply standing in front of a gate. They have to differentiate friend from foe. After all, people on the inside have to leave and authorized visitors have to be allowed to enter. A guard dog that attacked anyone who entered, no matter the circumstances, would be worse than useless. They’d be a legal liability.

German Shepherds, like many breeds, have excellent scenting abilities. But that raw potential has to be honed over years. The ability to smell gas leaks, drugs, bomb components and many other tasks are outside the normal experience of most dogs. Detecting alone isn’t enough. The dog has to react properly when the material is found.

Search and Rescue dogs may have the most difficult jobs of all. They have to have the intelligence to detect danger. They need the endurance to work under harsh conditions of extreme heat and cold, in low oxygen. They have to be in top shape to climb rock covered hills and up snow layered mountains.

Then they may not only locate, but actually move victims with broken legs or who are unconscious. It’s difficult enough for a strong human to undertake such demanding work. But for a German Shepherd to do so requires dedication, training and peak intelligence. Yet, they perform their jobs superlatively.

German Shepherds love to work. When trained well by someone who loves what they do, the results deserve high admiration. It’s earned.

So You Want a German Shepherd

Ever since Rin Tin Tin became a famous television personality, the German Shepherd has gone from an already popular dog breed to one of the most well known breeds on earth. This versatile dog breed seems to be everywhere that a dog can be of help, from war torn countries to areas where natural disasters have occurred. The powerful German Shepherd will strike terror in the hearts of criminals one minute and endure the overly affectionate attention of little children the next.

German Shepherds were bred to be guardians and the breed still has a very strong protective instinct. A dog that is high strung or nervous should never be bred, as the resulting puppies can be untrustworthy. However, most German Shepherds are wonderful dogs and devoted to their families, including children and other pets.

The German Shepherd is a fairly large dog, weighing from sixty to seventy five pounds and standing twenty two to twenty six inches tall. This breed has erect ears, dark, intelligent eyes, and a graceful tail. The German Shepherd is most commonly black and tan, although gray and tan or black and gray dogs are also available. A striking all white dog, commonly called an Alsatian, is popular with many people. If you like the look of the Alsatian, be sure you meet the puppy’s parents, as these white German Shepherds can sometimes be a bit high strung.

Although German Shepherds are high energy animals, they can live in the city. Just be aware that you will have to exercise your dog frequently and that he will be miserable if you leave him alone for long hours without giving him a job to do. Of course, a house with a big yard in a rural area is ideal.

Since your German Shepherd will rapidly grow into a big, powerful dog, you may want to enroll him in obedience classes while he is a puppy. It is much easier to control a small puppy than a full grown untrained dog. In addition, puppy obedience classes also help provide another important benefit for your German Shepherd puppy, socialization to other dogs and people. Many people who own these intelligent dogs make the unfortunate mistake of thinking that their dogs need to be trained as guard dogs. However, this training can lead to aggression if your dog is not trained properly. Since German Shepherds are naturally protective, they do not need attack dog training to guard your home.

The German Shepherd’s coat requires little grooming. The dense coat is coarse and does not mat easily. Brush your dog once a week to remove dirt and debris. If you live in the city, concrete will probably wear down your Shepherd’s nails. However, if your dog lives in a rural area he may need to have his nails trimmed several times a year.

German Shepherds need to eat a nutritional food that is formulated for large breed dogs. If your Shepherd is a working dog, you may need to feed him a high protein food. A good dog vitamin is also a smart idea.

This loyal, smart breed commonly suffers from hip dysplasia or epilepsy. To see one of these dignified dogs suffering from either disease is heart breaking. Please be sure that your puppy’s breeder has had the parents tested to be sure they do not carry these diseases.

If you want a dog who will be protective and loyal, then a German Shepherd may be the right dog for you and your family.

German Shepherd Puppy Essentials

By Kevin Coombs

A quick look at various items we suggest for your puppy. These will make your life and your puppy’s life more enjoyable.

Clicker: Using the Triple Crown Clicker is an easy and fun way to shape and reward positive behaviors in your dog. It is based on the scientific principles of Classical conditioning and Operant conditioning, and its ergonomic design makes it comfortable to use. For more information on how to use the Triple Crown Clicker, read their step-by-step training guide and watch their online instructional videos.

TOYS! We highly recommend the use of toys, balls, and tugs in the training of your dog. Most of our work is done with the ball on a string and tug toys. Toys and tugs are used to help motivate and maintain an energetic and willing partner. There are many varieties of toys and tugs and you will have to experiment a bit to find what works best for you and your dog.

Treats: We use small cut up hot dogs as the basis of our training treats. Find out what your dog likes and will work for. His kibble, hot dogs, cheese, etc. Once you know what they LOVE, they will really want to work for it and earn their “paycheck” from you.

Food:We feed Inoova Evo to all our adult dogs and young puppies starting at around 12weeks old. We feed Canidae all life stages to our young puppies from 4-12 weeks old and we ship a gallon ziplock bag with your puppy to transition your puppy to his new food if necessary.

Food/Water Dishes: When we do not feed our dogs out of Treat Balls, then we use the 1qt stainless steel dish. They are chew proof. We use the 6qt water buckets in their kennels and in the house. Less water spills out when they are drinking.

PLACE BED: We like the Kuranda beds. (50×35)They are the most durable and long lasting. Teach your puppy “place” and they can hang out and be part of the family and not get in trouble. Video of the how to train the “place” is on our Starke Pfoten Training Videos section.

Treat Balls: Provide hours of interactive chewing fun for your dog with the Triple Crown Everlasting Treat Ball™, and Fun Ball. Made of soft, yet durable puncture resistant materials, it will hold up to even the toughest chewers, and the unique design allows it to wobble and roll erratically. It’s great to use for preventing destructive boredom behaviors or to simply keep your dog happily occupied.

Chew Bones/Toys: We highly recommend the Nylabone products. For young puppies teething the “Flexable Chew” is great. We use the non edible “durable and big chews”, and they last very well. They are great for keeping teeth clean and white.

Grooming Supplies: Toe Nail Clippers, Slicker Brush, Rake, and Ear cleaning Solution. We suggest grooming once a week to keep your dog looking healthy and well groomed. This can be a great bonding time with your dog.

Crate: We send you home with a medium plastic airline crate. We recommend getting a bigger crate as your puppy grows. The crate should be a good place for your dog and not a punishment. It’s a place of safety, peace and quiet. Toss a couple of pieces of food in and give them a bone and treat ball.

Kennel:We recommend the use of an outside kennel. It’s great for those times when you can’t supervise your puppy for a long period of time. Give them some treat balls and a bone so they don’t get bored and bark. This also saves your flower bed and garden from digging.

TIE DOWN – NOT TIE OUT: We use tie downs in the house with young puppies who are not old enough to stay on their place beds. It is a non chewable 2′ cable with clips on both ends. Using an eye hook into a wall, and clip to the puppies collar, you can place them anywhere, or just hook them around a table leg. This keeps them with you, but under control while you cook dinner, watch TV, etc when you can’t watch them 100%.

For more information on German Shepherd Puppies and training visit http://www.starkepfoten.com

Starke Pfoten German Shepherds produce the highest quality German Shepherd Puppies and German Shepherd dogs for sale.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kevin_Coombs

The German Shepherd Dog

The German Shepherd Dog

By J Lewis

Dogs called German Shepherds were first exhibited at shows in Germany towards the end of the nineteenth century but they were hardly Shepherds as we know them today being rough coated, short tailed and rather resembling mongrels. The German Shepherd Dog as we now know it didn’t really appear until after the Second World War.

The breed has grown enormously in popularity and is now one of the most popular pedigree breeds in the UK as a pet, it is still the favourite working breed for many forces especially the police and they are widely used for security purposes.

It is a fine sight to see a well-trained GSD with his handler, working well to serve and protect. Unfortunately one of the saddest sites is the poor GSD used to guard premises often chained up alone in some dismal filthy yard with a lifetime of incarceration and little stimulation to look forward to.

The German Shepherd is a highly intelligent beast who will show undying devotion to his master but he is a dog that needs company and stimulation to be at his best.

If you are thinking of buying a German Shepherd Dog as a pet and you have not previously owned one, it is important to research the breed and talk to experienced owners so that you fully understand what you are taking on. GSD’s do indeed make wonderful family pets but it is important to remember that this is a working breed and that they do have certain characteristics that can make them more difficult than your average Retriever, Labrador or Collie.

The characteristics of a good working GSD should be firmness of nerve, attentiveness, unshockability, tractability, watchfulness, reliability, and incorruptibility together with courage tenacity and hardness. A German Shepherd is naturally protective and territorial which is something to bear in mind if you have lots of visitors to your house when careful introduction may be required to assure your pet that the visitor is not a threat to his family.

This is also a breed that requires a lot of time, stimulation, training and exercise – you will never wear them out, they will always be ready for more. A bored, lonely GSD can be very destructive and can cause an awful lot of damage to property in a short space of time.

Perhaps some of the less endearing traits of this breed are the tendency to be very vocal which can be a big nuisance and may be a problem with neighbours. They also shed hair in copious amounts all year round so your vacuum cleaner will work overtime and it’s unlikely that your clothes and furnishings will ever be free of dogs hairs again as well as what you are eating invariably being contaminated with that stray hairs.

The biggest problem with the German Shepherd Dog is the fact that to a large extent the breed is being spoilt by irresponsible breeding by inexperienced back street breeders who care nothing about preserving the breed but only about making money from the selling of puppies, Health and temperament problems are all too common, so it is important to take expert advice and try and find a reputable source if you are contemplating buying a puppy.

Consider first taking on a rescue German Shepherd Dog from a reputable rescue that should be able to give you a good assessment of a particular dog. Remember too that an older GSD will be a very rewarding addition to the family and will be housetrained, won’t chew, well behaved, probably require less exercise than a young dog and will be very loyal and grateful.

German Shepherd Dog Written by Jayne Shenstone who runs German Shepherd Rescue UK which helps rescue and rehome GSD’s across the UK

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=J_Lewis

Could a German Shepherd be the Right Dog for You?

Could a German Shepherd be the Right Dog for You?

By Clive Chansa

The German Shepherd Dog (Alsatian or Schafer(hund)) is an intelligent breed of dog. Because they are eager to please, they are easily trained in obedience and protection. The German Shepherd Dog is a large, strong, substantial-looking dog.

Ever since Rin Tin Tin became a famous television personality, the German Shepherd has gone from an already popular dog breed to one of the most well known breeds on earth. This versatile dog breed seems to be everywhere that a dog can be of help, from war torn countries to areas where natural disasters have occurred. The powerful German Shepherd will strike terror in the hearts of criminals one minute and endure the overly affectionate attention of little children the next.

German Shepherds were bred to be guardians and the breed still has a very strong protective instinct. A dog that is high strung or nervous should never be bred, as the resulting puppies can be untrustworthy. However, most German Shepherds are wonderful dogs and devoted to their families, including children and other pets.

The German Shepherd is a fairly large dog, weighing from sixty to seventy five pounds and standing twenty two to twenty six inches tall. This breed has erect ears, dark, intelligent eyes, and a graceful tail. The German Shepherd is most commonly black and tan, although gray and tan or black and gray dogs are also available. A striking all white dog, commonly called an Alsatian, is popular with many people. If you like the look of the Alsatian, be sure you meet the puppy’s parents, as these white German Shepherds can sometimes be a bit high strung.

Although German Shepherds are high energy animals, they can live in the city. Just be aware that you will have to exercise your dog frequently and that he will be miserable if you leave him alone for long hours without giving him a job to do. Of course, a house with a big yard in a rural area is ideal.

Since your German Shepherd will rapidly grow into a big, powerful dog, you may want to enroll him in obedience classes while he is a puppy. It is much easier to control a small puppy than a full grown untrained dog. In addition, puppy obedience classes also help provide another important benefit for your German Shepherd puppy, socialization to other dogs and people. Many people who own these intelligent dogs make the unfortunate mistake of thinking that their dogs need to be trained as guard dogs. However, this training can lead to aggression if your dog is not trained properly. Since German Shepherds are naturally protective, they do not need attack dog training to guard your home.

The German Shepherd’s coat requires very little grooming. The dense coat is coarse and does not mat easily. Brush your dog once a week to remove dirt and debris. If you live in the city, concrete will probably wear down your Shepherd’s nails. However, if your dog lives in a rural area he may need to have his nails trimmed several times a year.

German Shepherds need to eat a nutritional food that is formulated for large breed dogs. If your Shepherd is a working dog, you may need to feed him a high protein food. A good dog vitamin is also a smart idea.

This loyal, smart breed commonly suffers from hip dysplasia or epilepsy. To see one of these dignified dogs suffering from either disease is heart breaking. Please be sure that your puppy’s breeder has had the parents tested to be sure they do not carry these diseases.

German Shepherd Dogs are often used as working dogs in many capacities, including search and rescue, military, police or guard dogs. They are also used as assistance dogs or service dogs (such as guide dogs).

If you want a dog who will be protective and loyal, then a German Shepherd may be the right dog for you and your family.

Clive Chansa writes for the Dog Care Guide at http://www.dog-care-help.com/ and the Pet Care Supplies Uk website at http://www.pet-care-supplies.co.uk/ which offers a wide range of pet products and supplies.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Clive_Chansa

5 Thing You Should Know Before Choosing a German Shepherd

5 Thing You Should Know Before Choosing a German Shepherd

By Tommy Davis

German Shepherds are an incredibly loving, intelligent breed of dog and are the ideal pet for active families. They love being with people and are generally extremely eager to please their human companions.

There are 5 things you should know before you make your decision.

1. Appearance and Size. The German Shepherd is a medium to large size dog. Height: 22-26 inches. Weight: 65-95 lbs

2. Personality. The German Shepherd dog is extremely intelligent, easily trainable, loyal and faithful throughout his life. The breed is popular for being a police dog, and often used in search in rescue missions. He is also a popular companion dog, a part of the family, and a guard dog.

3. Home and Family Relations. German shepherd are extremely tolerant by nature. For this reason they are excellent pets for children, and a natural protector. And with the proper obedience training they can be an imposing guard dog.

4. Training. Training should begin early in life. Untrained German shepherd have a tendency to be difficult to handle and/or control. German shepherd training is a process that can take many hours of work on both your part and that of your dog, but the rewards are certainly worth it. Basic training of your German shepherd will take anywhere between a few weeks to several months, depending on the amount of time you have to put in to it. You will find that it is time and effort very well spent.

5. Health. Most common diseases are Hip dysplasia, bloat, aortic stenosis.

A German shepherd in your family will require a lot of your time and careful training. They require daily exercise, if not, they will want to jump all over you and your guests in their excitement, especially when they are still young, and can also be aggressive towards other animals.

Tommy Davis

For more information on dogs, and submit your own dog story. Visit http://www.dog-basics.info

Article Source: Tommy Davis

Worried About Which Breed of Dog is Best for Your Family? Find Some Answers Here

Worried About Which Breed of Dog is Best for Your Family? Find Some Answers Here

By Niall Kennedy

Ask ten experts how many breeds of dogs exist and you will get ten different answers. However, many estimate there are more than 300 breeds of dogs. Each is valued by someone or by a group of people. In fact, they exist because they were bred to have characteristics that make them well suited for specific tasks. Over thousands of years, dogs were bred to meet a variety of human needs.

Chihuahuas, Pekinese and Shih-Tzus are generally known as toy breeds – very small types of dogs, often weighing less than ten pounds. The dogs were bred to be mainly companions rather than perform physical labor. These dogs were the basis of the phrase “lap” dogs as they were easily held in their owners’ laps.

Dogs in the Hound group come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, and were all originally bred to assist with hunting. Many hound types have an amazing sense of smell; others are best known for their stamina during the chase.

German shepards, Doberman pinchers, Rottweilers, Mastiffs, Giant Schnauzers and Boxers are just a few of the better known types of working dogs.

Working dogs have the size and strength that makes them well suited to guarding property and other intense physical tasks. They are well known for their extremely high intelligence and protective nature to their human companions.

Like the Hounds, dogs from the Sporting group were bred to assist with hunting. Alert and active by nature, sporting dogs fit in well with active owners. If you plan on adding any type of sporting dog to your family, keep in mind that these high-energy dogs need frequent exercise.

The dog breeds included in the Non-Sporting group vary greatly in appearance and abilities. Dalmatians, with their vast amount of stamina and energy, were set to run alongside carriages to guard the travelers inside. Later, firemen employed these unique dogs to guard fire wagons. Dalmatians are playful and loyal, and need human companionship.

Poodles were originally bred as work animals. These dogs are highly intelligent and one of the most trainable breeds. Some poodles are good guard dogs and some can be trained as hunters.

Terriers are known for their distinctive personalities. Bred to hunt vermin, terriers are instinctive, active diggers. Tenacious by nature, these lively dogs require owners willing to provide lots of physical and mental stimulation.

Sight hounds were bred to assist the hunter by virtue of their excellent eyesight. Instead of finding prey by scent, these lean hunters spot their quarry from a great distance. They have amazing stamina and energy and all members of this group need plenty of exercise.

Hopefully this information will help you to decide what breed of dog is right for bringing into your family. Whichever breed you decide on you need to remember that your dog will rely on you for everything from food and water, to shelter and exercise. In return for this you can expect lifelong devotion and love from your new best friend.

Best Pet Health Information is a resource which will help you find infomation, hints and tips to keep your dog happy and healthy. http://www.best-pet-health.info Copyright © Best-Pet-Health.info. All rights reserved. This article may be reprinted in full so long as the resource box and the live links are included intact.

Article Source: Niall Kennedy

German Shepherd Complete Profile

German Shepherd Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
German Shepherd
Key Facts:

Size: Large
Height: 56 – 66 cm (22 – 26 inches)
Weight: 42 – 52 kg (92 – 115 lb)
Life Span: 13 years
Grooming: Medium
Exercise: Demanding
Feeding: Medium
Temperament: Protective & highly trainable
Country of Origin: Germany
AKC Group: Herding
Other Names: Alsatian, Deutscher Schäferhund

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Proud, powerful and dignified.
Colour: Black, black/tan or grey with or without shadings. Small white markings on the chest or inside of the legs is permitted.
Coat: The outercoat is thick, harsh and straight. The undercoat is thick and short on the head.
Tail: Set low, bushy and never carried about the level of the back.
Ears: Medium size, broad at the base, set high, carried erect and pointed forward. The ears of the puppies may stay hanging until around 6 months or older and don’t become erect until the replacement of the baby teeth.
Body: The chest is deep but not too broad. The shoulders are long, oblique and well laid back. The back is straight and the ribs are long and well sprung.

Temperament:
Active, bold, determined and watchful. German Shepherds make excellent watchdogs, as they are naturally suspicious of strangers and very protective of their family. This breed gets on well with children but can be territorial with other dogs. They are extremely intelligent and trainable dogs and make ideal household companions.

Grooming:
Minimal attention is needed for the coat. During moulting use a comb to remove the dead and loose hairs.

Exercise:
It is important that owners do not overlook the fact that German Shepherds are keen to work for their handler and that simply being companions in the home is insufficient. Ideally these dogs would be involved in activities such as obedience, agility, police trials or whatever else that can keep them both mentally and physically healthy.

History:
It was in Germany in 1899 that the German Shepherd became a distinctive breed. They had been used as guard dogs, but when livestock began being transported by rail and there were fewer wolves, the German Shepherd’s abilities had to move into other fields. The most valued dogs were those that could fulfill the greatest number of tasks and due to the excellent versatility of these dogs they became an extremely popular breed throughout the world.

Additional Comments:

In the past some strains of this breed were nervous, overprotective or had an unreliable temperament, due to inbreeding. However these days after careful breeding these difficulties have been greatly reduced. It is important to buy from a reputable breeder to ensure the dog will have a good temperament.

This breed would have to be one of the best known in the world. The German Shepherd has been used as a guide dog and worked with the police, armed services, drug officers and private protection agencies.

The German Shepherd is the only breed for which there is a worldwide organization set up for matters relating to this breed.

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About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/german_shepherd/