Posts Tagged Labradoodle

The Popular Labradoodle Dog

The Popular Labradoodle Dog

By Sandra Oberreuter

The Labradoodle is a cross between a Labrador Retriever and a Standard Poole. They are the most popular “designer dogs”. They make a wonderful companion and family pet. They also make a good service animal if trained right. These dogs are friendly, energetic and loyal. They make good watchdogs.

HISTORY

Labradoodles were started in the 1970’s by Wally Cochran when a woman requested a guide dog that wouldn’t aggravate her husband’s allergies. He bred a low maintenance and temperament of a Lab with the allegen reduced coat of the Standard Poodle and the Labradoodle came to be.

The Labradoodles are compact dogs. Their bodies are a little heavier than the Standard Poodle. Broad heads, ears flat against their head, eyes sit well apart that are slightly round and expressive, nose is large and a low set tail. Their curly or wavy coats are 4-6 inches long and come in many colors:

* Chalk
* cream
* aprioct
* chocolate
* cafe
* black
* silver

They are a hypoallergenic dog with a low to non-shedding allergy coat. Plus they don’t have a doggie odor.

Labradoodles come in three sizes:

* Standard

Height: 23-26 inches

Weight: 45-77 pounds

* Medium

Height: 18-21 inches

Weight: 45-77 pounds

* Miniature

Height: 14-17 inches

Weight: 40-55 pounds

* Life Span: 13-15 years

GROOMING

Regular grooming to keep coat looking good with a trim 2-3 times a year to prevent matting of their coats.

EXERCISE

Labradoodles need exercise and to best with a yard. He love to takes walks and would make an excellent dog for someone who loves to be outdoors. He also love water and are natural swimmers.

These dogs are good with children if properly socialized and are loyal the “their” families. They are a very intelligent dog and are very trainable just like both the Lab and Poodle. Make training techniques fun to keep there attention. If training is consistent they should be easy to housebreak too.

CHARACTERTICS AND TEMPERAMENT

* Extremely clever

* Sociable

* Joyful

* Sweet temperament

* Very lovable

* Friendly

* Non-aggressive

* Loyalty of Lab

* Good watchdog

HEALTH

Check your Labradoodles breeding history because through good breeding your dog will have less health issues. Common labradoodles disorders are:

* Hip dysplasia

* Elbow sysplasia

* Hypothyriodism

* Retinal atrophy

* Patella luxation

These dogs cost between $895.00 – $2,195.00 depending on their coat and color. Look for a reputable breeder or adopt from a Labradoodle rescue.

Sandy has a web site on small dog breeds with articles on the most popular ones, plus dogs good with children and seniors, hypoallergenic dogs, most popular dogs, choosing a dog, choosing a vet and breeder and much more. http://www.small-dogbreeds.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sandra_Oberreuter

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

By Steve Allison

Although the concept is by no means new; many people are discovering that some of the latest breeds of super dogs are not as great as their breeders would have you believe.

Of the “designer dog club” the ‘Labradoodle’ is probably the most well known. The ‘Labradoodle’ was originally bred for sight impaired individuals who had severe reactions to dog’s fur. This new hybrid aimed to combine the intelligence of the Labrador with a non-shedding poodle. However you may or may not have a puppy that will be non-shedding. Labradoodles have been around for over 20 years and are gaining recognition.

But the term ‘designer mutts’ can be used to describe any number of endless combinations of dogs who have been bred for particular valued qualities. Ever thought about owning a Dorgi? That’s a cross between a Corgi and a Dachshund. How about a Puggle? That’s a cross between a Beagle and a Puggle. There are many variations on breeds with poodles now too. This often results in comical names – the Corgi Poo; or the Shih Poo, the variations are endless.

Hypoallergenic, intelligent and some say healthier than average – these dogs are becoming popular throughout the world. Yet the American Kennel Club refuses to accept these new breeds. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes 153 breeds at present; and says that these dogs don’t meet their criteria.

The American Hybrid Club seems to be the answer for the breeders who are rallying to have their new combinations recognized. They argue that in fact all dog breeds exist as a result of some kind of experimentation with mixing breeds.

There are many inherent dangers associated with mixing breeds that would never have bred naturally. The main problem is that you never really know exactly what you will be getting. Most often you can learn a great deal about a dog by the look and temperament of their parents – but with these dogs there is no way to tell if you will end up with a mouse sized dog – or a dog the size of a small donkey.

And it’s not just looks. You might be unpleasantly surprised to find that your new puppy has the temperament of a hostile dictator; or worse is very aggressive. These are serious faults; especially if you intend to introduce your cute new ‘Schnoodle’ (a mixture of a Schnauzer and a poodle) to your kids you never know what might happen.

Is that really a chance you want to take?

Also, these new breeds are by no means considered cheap. You could get an equivalent mix at a shelter for free. But some breeders are charging thousands of dollars for dogs they cannot personally guarantee. They claim these dogs take the best of both breeds. But there is an equal risk that the dog can end up with the worst from breeds. This seems like a staggering chance to take.

In an attempt to create super dog these breeders are using breeding techniques that seem strangely unnatural. Certain Bulldog combinations always require artificial insemination for successful mating to occur. And you can’t count on Caesar section. Many of the crossbreeds are bred for profit. Unscrupulous practices which lead to fashion item dogs will create a host of problems for future generations.

If you have your heart set on a designer dog bear in mind you might end up paying more in vet bills. Your puppy will need a vast array of tests.

There are many well-established variations. Purebred dogs have a proven track record. You can say with greater certainty what your Labrador will look like. You will also have a greater idea of what kinds of health problems to expect in your Dachshund.

You can also find adult crossbreeds in a number of places. Adult dogs are often a good choice for families who have children or who need to be sure of the dog’s temperament. And of course giving a loving home to a homeless dog is always a good thing. If you have your heart set on one of the new crossbreeds; try to learn what you can before deciding on the particular dog or cross.

Steve Allison is a third generation of professional dog breeders along with his brother Gary. It all started with his grandparents in 1970 with the Boston Terriers and has expanded to Maltese, Yorkshire Terriers, Pugs, Shih Tzu’s and Pomeranians. He is also actively involved with dog rescue and has a website that showcases the puppies they occasionally has for sale at All My Puppies Online Steve is also the co-author of two consumer guides, Carpet Secrets and Moving Secrets Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steve_Allison

Puggle Dogs and Designer Dog Facts – The Truth About Puggles

Puggle Dogs and Designer Dog Facts – The Truth About Puggles

By Jenny Smith

Puggle Dogs are a fairly new mixed breed. They’re a half breed combined with a pug and a beagle. They are one of the cutest mix breed dogs out there today. They have a very mellow, loving temperament. Puggles are ideal family pets, because they do so well with young children. They’re all around lovable, and not normally a one person dog as are pugs. Puggles become attached to anyone that will give them the time of day and feed them. This breed is also very easily trained. This makes it great for that always terrible training period in a young pups life.

Anyone that has experienced raising a dog from infancy knows that you go through a period of potty training. Some dogs are better than others during this stage. Some breeds are very easily trained and you never have much of a problem with them, while others are not always so. Puggles learn to obey commands well, while many breeds never seem to grasp this key concept. This makes the chewing stage a little more easy to cope with as well. They will most certainly go through that chewing stage like any puppy, but they seem to learn the word “no” very well, and obey commands earlier than most.

Puggles don’t posses the eye’s that pop out or the completely flat noses that make breathing often times difficult for the pug. They seem to be the perfect cross between two dogs with several flaws. They also don’t have the miserable howl, like beagles do. They’ve got the perfect combination of good looks and great characteristics. All this combined is the ingredients of the perfect companion. There are so many breeds of dog out there today, that it can be hard to choose the one for you. As time goes on there is continually more and more breeds being discovered and created. The first known breed of dogs stemmed primarily from the wolf in the northwest region. In Egypt one of the first dogs was the basenji. The basenji is a compact hunter whose ancestry is depicted in Egyptian tombs dating around 5,000 years old. The interesting thing about this dog is that it doesn’t bark. It makes little chortles and yodels, and snarls. This dog, like the wolf can only be bred once a year. Most dogs can be bred twice a year. Here are a few of the older breeds known to man;

• Saluki
• Afghan Hound
• St Bernard
• Alaskan Malamute
• Lhasa Apso

Many modern day cross breed dogs stemmed from one or more of these older dogs. After these dogs came some more breeds that pushed the evolution of dogs a litter further. They are as follows;

• Miniature Poodle
• Pembroke Welsh Corgi
• Mountain Cur
• Australian Shepherd

And so began the cross bred dog. Some say that cross breed dogs are not a good thing. They believe that these designer dogs are a fashion statement to many. In turn, this excludes all other breeds from having homes. The majority of people nowadays want some sort of cross breed. Whether it be a puggle (pug & beagle mix), a labradoodle (Labrador retriever & Poodle mix), or a Schnoodle (Miniature Schnauzer-Poodle mix). Many dog owners argue that these mixed breeds aren’t a real breed, merely overpriced mutts. Many press the point that before you go buying a designer dog to go down to the local shelter and see what’s available. Although these mixed breed dogs are adorable, you don’t always have to pay that designer price. Often times these mixed breeds can be found at shelters as well, and for less than half the price! There are hundreds to thousands of dogs each year that are homeless, and are taken to these animal shelters in hopes of finding homes for them. Just because they aren’t a purebred mix doesn’t mean they won’t be the best companion ever! The puggle is a recognized purebred mix.

A man by the name of Gary Garner is the president of the American Canine Hybrid Club. His company offers certificates of authentication for a mere price of $20. These are available to anyone who can prove that they are owners of the offspring of two different breed purebred dogs. He gets letters upon letters of hate mail coming from many purebred owners. Although this seems to angry many, hundreds are getting this done every day.

The best piece of advice for anyone considering getting a dog as a pet, is to do the research. Research each dog you think you may want, and compare them to one another. Here are a few key things to consider when shopping for the breed that’s right for you:

• Size?
• Easily trainable?
• Shedding? (little, average, constant.)
• Coat? (Wire, thick, long, short, etc.)
• Grooming? (weekly, daily, moderate.)
• Aggressive characteristics?
• Family dog?
• Good with everyone, or one man dog?
• Common characteristic habits with this breed?
• Health issues common to breed?

Many celebrities have taken a liking to the puggle as well. Here are a few new owners of the breed; Jake Gyllenhaal, James Gandolfini, Sylvester Stallone and Julianne Moore. Anyone who discovers this new furry friend can’t control the urge to get one of their own. Time to get out there and find the perfect breed for you! Oh wait, you already found it…….The PUGGLE!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jenny_Smith

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

By Steve Allison

Although the concept is by no means new; many people are discovering that some of the latest breeds of super dogs are not as great as their breeders would have you believe.

Of the “designer dog club” the ‘Labradoodle’ is probably the most well known. The ‘Labradoodle’ was originally bred for sight impaired individuals who had severe reactions to dog’s fur. This new hybrid aimed to combine the intelligence of the Labrador with a non-shedding poodle. However you may or may not have a puppy that will be non-shedding. Labradoodles have been around for over 20 years and are gaining recognition.

But the term ‘designer mutts’ can be used to describe any number of endless combinations of dogs who have been bred for particular valued qualities. Ever thought about owning a Dorgi? That’s a cross between a Corgi and a Dachshund. How about a Puggle? That’s a cross between a Beagle and a Puggle. There are many variations on breeds with poodles now too. This often results in comical names – the Corgi Poo; or the Shih Poo, the variations are endless.

Hypoallergenic, intelligent and some say healthier than average – these dogs are becoming popular throughout the world. Yet the American Kennel Club refuses to accept these new breeds. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes 153 breeds at present; and says that these dogs don’t meet their criteria.

The American Hybrid Club seems to be the answer for the breeders who are rallying to have their new combinations recognized. They argue that in fact all dog breeds exist as a result of some kind of experimentation with mixing breeds.

There are many inherent dangers associated with mixing breeds that would never have bred naturally. The main problem is that you never really know exactly what you will be getting. Most often you can learn a great deal about a dog by the look and temperament of their parents – but with these dogs there is no way to tell if you will end up with a mouse sized dog – or a dog the size of a small donkey.

And it’s not just looks. You might be unpleasantly surprised to find that your new puppy has the temperament of a hostile dictator; or worse is very aggressive. These are serious faults; especially if you intend to introduce your cute new ‘Schnoodle’ (a mixture of a Schnauzer and a poodle) to your kids you never know what might happen.

Is that really a chance you want to take?

Also, these new breeds are by no means considered cheap. You could get an equivalent mix at a shelter for free. But some breeders are charging thousands of dollars for dogs they cannot personally guarantee. They claim these dogs take the best of both breeds. But there is an equal risk that the dog can end up with the worst from breeds. This seems like a staggering chance to take.

In an attempt to create super dog these breeders are using breeding techniques that seem strangely unnatural. Certain Bulldog combinations always require artificial insemination for successful mating to occur. And you can’t count on Caesar section. Many of the crossbreeds are bred for profit. Unscrupulous practices which lead to fashion item dogs will create a host of problems for future generations.

If you have your heart set on a designer dog bear in mind you might end up paying more in vet bills. Your puppy will need a vast array of tests.

There are many well-established variations. Purebred dogs have a proven track record. You can say with greater certainty what your Labrador will look like. You will also have a greater idea of what kinds of health problems to expect in your Dachshund.

You can also find adult crossbreeds in a number of places. Adult dogs are often a good choice for families who have children or who need to be sure of the dog’s temperament. And of course giving a loving home to a homeless dog is always a good thing. If you have your heart set on one of the new crossbreeds; try to learn what you can before deciding on the particular dog or cross.

Steve Allison is a third generation of professional dog breeders along with his brother Gary. It all started with his grandparents in 1970 with the Boston Terriers and has expanded to Maltese, Yorkshire Terriers, Pugs, Shih Tzu’s and Pomeranians. He is also actively involved with dog rescue and has a website that showcases the puppies they occasionally has for sale at All My Puppies Online Steve is also the co-author of two consumer guides, Carpet Secrets and Moving Secrets Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steve_Allison

Designer Dog Breed – Meet The Roodle

Designer Dog Breed – Meet The Roodle

By Rebecca Prescott

Celebrities like Paris Hilton may carry their dogs in their Gucci handbags, accessorized to the glittering collar. But the recent trend in designer dogs seems to suggest that everyday people are catching this unfortunate trend.

Instead of simply buying diamante collars, however, people are demanding cross bred dogs with catchy marketing names. We’ve had the Spoodle, the Groodle, the Labradoodle, the Spanador, the Cavador, and the Retrievador. Now folks, meet the Roodle.

The roodle is a cross between a poodle and a rottweiler. They are the successful creation of a breeder from Melbourne, Australia. Fred Freeman has successfully bred 3 litters of roodles, some going as far afield as Hawaii.

Roodles have the crinkly coat of a poodle, but larger. They are quite stocky, and fairly big, with long floppy ears. Mr Freeman describes the dogs as having the intelligence of a rottweiler, yet docile and easy to train. His roodles are also non aggressive, do not moult, don’t smell, and are low on the allergy scale.

The idea of creating a non allergic dog was what started the original breeder of the labradoodle, Wally Conran. Wally was the Manager of the Royal Guide Dog Association in Australia at the time. Someone needing a guide dog who was non allergenic contacted the Guide Dog Association, and Wally successfully crossed a labrador with a poodle that fitted this purpose.

So, the origins of the labradoodle were quite in keeping with the way many of what are now considered pure bred dogs were created. That is, they were created with a specific purpose in mind.

But the popularity of the labradoodle has created a new set of problems. Namely, many unscrupulous people, some with no experience breeding dogs, and others with none, or little, experience breeding labradoodles or other similar crosses, jumped on the bandwagon. Demand meant that these dogs were expensive, supply was short, and this attracted many into this new field.

But breeding dogs, especially across different breeds, is not simple. In Wally Conran’s original efforts, not all labradoodles were low in allergy. And when it comes to trying to come up with new mixes, a lack of knowledge can produce disastrous results. For instance, breeding two dogs with similar genetic weaknesses can lead to the new litters born with an increased chance of the health problems associated with those breeds. Other factors include disposition. If people are expecting certain traits based on what decent breeders have produced, and they pay a lot of money for a dog that turns our to be completely different, those dogs may well end up being abandoned.

In the case of a dog bought to be low allergenic, this likelihood is higher, and this is exactly what is happening to many of the labradoodles being bought in the US now. They are ending up in shelters because they do not have the characteristics of the carefully bred stock the variation originated from.

And given that badly bred rottweilers can be very aggressive, if the roodle trend takes off in the same way, this could be a disaster all round. Especially so if a family with children bought one expecting the docile nature of the roodles created by Mr Freeman, and end up with an aggressive, large dog.

Labradoodles are not consistent breeds. And given that ten years was spent trying to get a rottweiler poodle cross, there is every indication to think that roodles are not a consistent breed either. That means that simply mating a rottweiler with a poodle is not going to automatically get you certain characteristics, especially in temperament.

Normally, contacting an association for a recommended breeder would solve this type of problem. But in this brave new world of designer dogs, this may not always be the case. Especially if the experience with the labradoodles is anything to go by.

The breeders at Rutland Manor and Tegan Park in Australia started their stock from labradors, poodles and labradoodles from Don Evans, another breeder who had discovered the breed independently of the Guide Dog Association. Those labradoodles were legitimate labradoodles, and they kept records of all subsequent breeding. They also determined which coats were low allergenic. They conducted extensive research and breeding programs to arrive at the dog that has become characterized as a ‘labradoodle’. Contrary to popular knowledge, they are not the product of exclusively mixing in labradors and poodles. Other breeds were used occasionally, for certain characteristics.

The breeders at Rutland Manor and Tegan Park began calling their dogs, and those descended from that stock by reputable breeders, Australian labradoodles, to distinguish them from the labrador-poodle mixes that were being indiscriminately produced. The mixes were not quality controlled, many were allergenic, yet people with allergies were misled into buying them, expecting not to get allergic reactions.

The International Labradoodle Association was set up originally to help maintain the quality and characteristics of this new designer dog. Yet they now are seeking to call all labrador-poodle crosses ‘Australian labradoodles’. If this is successful, consumers will have no way of knowing whether they are buying what they think they are, and what their health requirements determine they need. The end result will be more abandoned dogs being euthanased because of a careless association and even more careless breeders.

It does not bode well for the roodle.

If you need a low allergy dog, try Bichon Frise dogs. Or if you’d prefer to read about more dog breeds, click here. Rebecca Prescott runs the website, http://www.thedogsbone.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rebecca_Prescott

“Designer” or Mixed Breed Dogs

“Designer” or Mixed Breed Dogs

By Gage Killian

Designer dogs are the up and coming rage among Hollywood and dog lovers alike. Dogs like the puggle (pug + beagle), the cockapoo aka cockerpoo or spoodle(cocker-spaniel + poodle), the labradoodle (Labrador retriever + poodle), the peekapoo (pekingnese + poodle) and the Schnoodle (Schnauzer + Poodle) are growing ever more popular today than ever before. Why are these “mutts” so big right now?

1. Cute Names – Designer dogs have cute names that people love and make the appearance of a new breed of dog that very few have heard of. For example: the puggle.

2. Great for those with allergies – Unlike some purebred dogs, designer dogs are often bred to reduce the amount of allergens they produce by not having an undercoat.

3. Sheds less – Some designer dogs are bred to shed less than other dogs.

4. Genetic advantage – Believed to be less prone to inbreeding, the designer dog is thought to have better temperaments and also thought to be smarter and more trainable than their purebred counter parts.

Controversy surrounding these dogs have made purebred dog owners enraged. It’s bad for there business and the qualities listed above only hold true in specific cases. The designer dog fad has also had its fallbacks.

1. Bad breeding – bad breeding leads to unwanted dogs. Many people want to produce a designer dog without doing back-ground checks and without the skills needed to do so.

2. Bad owners – Some believe that just because they bought a designer dog means that they don’t need to train, care for or love their pet as much. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Designer dogs need just as much care and attention as all other dogs do, if not more.

3. More expensive – the price for these dogs have sky-rocketed sometimes hit the $1,000 mark. Sometimes its better just to go to the humane society or animal shelter and find a perfectly fine dog. The shots and care for these dogs can make their prices higher as well.

Don’t get me wrong, these are wonderful pets. However, they need wonderful owners as well. Love and care and proper healthcare and grooming are essential for a happy life-long companion. If you would like to keep your costs and concerns down when purchasing a designer dog I suggest that you check its breeding history and do temperament tests as well as get them screened for certain common genetic disorders such as hip-dysplasia and retinal atrophy. Proper preparation and responsible habits lead to a great dog.

Gage Killian – pet enthusiast, web publisher
http://www.cockapoodog.info
http://www.puggleluv.com
http://www.caninefacts.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gage_Killian

Labradoodles and Goldendoodles, A new breed of dogs

Labradoodles and Goldendoodles, A new breed of dogs

by Ruth Bird

A fellow blogger was always mentioning “puggles” to me. Then one day I went for a walk with my 3 dogs and my neighbour and her dog. She mentioned the labradoodles and goldendoodles to me. She had seen them on a t.v. show.

So, I decided to do some investigating. For those who want some information about these dogs, but not long scientific reports, here is my article. I went on a long internet journey, and I found out some amazing facts.

At first I though someone was maybe just getting bored, and decided to create a new breed of dog. But no, there are some very valid reasons for breeding these mixtures. Just read on, and you may find that there are reasons why you may want to look into one of these “oodle” dogs yourself.

As always, do lots of research and get lots of recommendations from current “oodle” owners. There are also forums and clubs that you can find on the internet. These can also help you decide if one of these is for you.

In the meantime, just enjoy learning something new, and when your neighbour tells you about an “oodle” dog, then you will know what they are talking about.

A Labradoodle is a crossbred dog created by crossing the Labrador Retriever and the Poodle. Their temperament makes them good service and family dogs.

The impetus behind experiments with this type of cross was the desire to achieve a service dog that would not shed and so produce a hypoallergenic dog that is suitable for people with allergies to fur and dander. This has not yet been reliably achieved, as Labradoodles have varying coat lengths and textures, and crosses beyond the first generation do not yield a predictable coat type.

The result of this cross produced intelligent, easily trainable puppies that were the beginning of the Labradoodle as we now know it. Crossing these two breeds also gave the Labradoodle a hybrid vigor and a variety of coat types.

Labradoodles combine the best of the 2 breeds.

Labradoodles are known to posses the gentle, sweet disposition of the retrievers combined with the intelligence and allergy friendly coats of the poodles. Labradoodles are wonderful with children and people who have special needs. They are non-aggressive, highly intelligent dogs that are extremely easy to train. They want nothing more than to please their people.

The Labradoodle can vary in size: Standard, Medium and Miniature

Color varies from chalk (milky white), shades of cream, gold, black, chocolate, red, caramel and silver.

Coat: Labradoodles usually have no body odor, require minimal bathing and brushing and rarely, if ever, attract fleas. They seldom shed hair but will need to be groomed.

Wooly: Somewhat like a poodle. Requires regular grooming and is allergy friendly.

Fleece: The ultimate coat. It is easily maintained, non shedding, allergy and asthma friendly.

Hair: Anything from flat and straight to curls down the back and possibly wavy. It can vary from minimally to profusely shedding. Not likely to be allergy friendly.

Allergy and Asthma sufferers – Labradoodles may be the breed for you! Check it out…

The Labradoodle is still under development. Strictly speaking, the labradoodle cannot yet be described as a dog breed because it does not breed true. Further, the breed standards of breeds-under-development are invariably freer, more open to interpretation and cover more observable types than those of established or kennel club-recognized breeds.

The term Goldendoodle (Golden Doodle) describes a hybrid dog, crossbred between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle. This hybrid is often said to have begun in Australia, along with the Labradoodle;

US fanciers challenge this assertion. Poodle hybrids have become increasingly popular and it is likely that the combination of Golden Retriever and Poodle has been duplicated by breeders in various countries.

Goldendoodles are intelligent and obedient. The make great family pets and will be wonderful companions. They are vey social and devoted to family members. They are people dogs, good with kids and other dogs and pets, and friendly with strangers.

Goldendoodles are likely to get into mischief if they spend most of their lives alone or bored. (My golden retriever certainly gets in trouble when bored. I can vouch for that first hand.) They are intelligent and love to please, therefore, they are very easy to train. They are a medium to large size family dog with great temperaments.

When bred correctly, most of your first hybrid crosses are much healthier because they are NOT in-bred or line-bred or back-bred to their cousins, fathers, mothers, sisters and brothers. The Goldendoodle can work out well for those who suffer from allergies. They shed little to none, and they are very loving dogs. If you have allergy or dog hair concerns, look into a goldendoodle.

There are some amazing Labradoodle and Goldendoodle sites on the internet, with references to breeders in USA and Canada, and World Wide. These sites have some beautiful pictures of dogs and puppies. You will fall in love with them. I did instantly. That is why I posted about these dogs on my blog. And that is why I was so compelled to write about them.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

My name is Ruth Bird. I have been married for 27 years to my husband, Chris. Chris has been battling the monster, MS, for a number of years. Pet Health Care is my passion. My pet blog is: http://mypetplace.blogspot.com/

Source: Article Search Engine: GoArticles.com

Oodles of Doodles! A peek at poodle crossbreeds

Oodles of Doodles! A peek at poodle crossbreeds

by D. Robert Williams

They’re called “crossbreeds”, “hybrids”, and sometimes simply “mutts”, but offspring of mixed canine heritage have the best qualities of their purebred parents–but are healthier and more robust.

Goldendoodles

A Goldendoodle (or Golden Doodle) is a product of breeding a golden retriever with a poodle. Goldendoodles were originally bred as the perfect pet for physically challenged people who needed an assistance dog that wouldn’t agitate their allergies. The Goldendoodle’s low shedding coat and high intelligence fit the bill, and has made them a family favorite since their appearance in United States in the mid 1990’s.

Smaller Goldendoodles are considered “Miniature”, and are the product of golden retriever and minature or toy poodle parents. Weights vary from 25 to 45 pounds, far smaller than the largest standard size Goldendoodles (from standard poodle lineage) which can weigh over 75 pounds.

Colors and coats vary widely, from cream to brown to black, with poodle curls or the shaggy retriever look. No matter what the look, all goldendoodles have that ever-important low shedding coat, a sharp mind and friendly temperament.

Labradoodles

Labradoodles are the product of labrador retriever and poodle parents, and have much in common with Goldendoodles. Like the Goldendoodle, Labradoodles were bred to be low-allergen guide dogs, originating in Australia in the early 1990’s.

There are three size categories for Labradoodles, depending on parentage, ranging from the 25-pound miniature to the 75+ pound standard, with medium Labradoodles at around 50 pounds. You will find Labradoodles in a wider range of colors than Goldendoodles: white, cream, tan, coffee, brown, red, grey, or black. Their coats are a little shorter at 3-4″, but the same varying texture.

Both of these poodle crossbreeds are remarkably fit, showing none of the major health concerns of their purebred parents, and a life expectancy of 13-15 years.

Other Poodle Crossbreeds

Hybrids from poodles of varying sizes include:

Schnoodle = Schnauzer + Poodle
Cockapoo = Cocker Spaniel + Poodle
Chi-Poo = Chihuahua + Poodle
Doodleman Pinscher = Doberman + Poodle
English Boodle = English Bulldog + Poodle
Eskapoo = American Eskimo Dog + Poodle
Lhasapoo = Lhasa Apso + Poodle
Pekepoo = Pekingese + Poodle
Pomapoo = Pomeranian + Poodle
Pugapoo = Pug + Poodle
Saint Berdoodle = Saint Bernard + Poodle
Schnoodle = Schnauzer + Poodle
Scoodle = Scottish Terrier + Poodle
Weimardoodle = Weimaraner + Poodle

Note: One crossbred pup left off this list is the popular and comical Puggle, which is often mistaken for a pug/poodle mix, but is actually the offspring of pug and beagle parents.

About the Author

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