Posts Tagged Pictures

5 of The Most Well-Mannered Dog Breeds

With so many different breeds available, choosing a dog that suits you can be difficult. Different dog breeds present different traits, personalities and characteristics that can make them a good or bad fit for your lifestyle and environment.

Individuals that are looking for a dog to become a household pet or to live alongside a family will be interested in a breed that thrives in those conditions. If you want a dog to keep you company while you relax in one of your Amish shaker chairs or that would enjoy playing with your children and has a friendly nature, here are some dog breeds for consideration.

The Newfoundland

medium_4661250864

The Newfoundland is widely considered one of the most kind-hearted and gentle dogs in existence. While their large size can be deceiving, the Newfoundland possesses a very sweet disposition. Due to their protective nature when it comes to families and their children, Newfoundlands make great household pets.

This breed is also known for its intelligence, patience and loyalty. For individuals looking for a very friendly pet or a dog that will seamlessly fit in with the family, the Newfoundland is an excellent breed to consider.

Labrador Retriever

medium_145648847

Recognized by petMD as one of the most popular dog breeds, the Labrador Retriever is a patient and loving dog. Its playful nature makes it an excellent dog for households that have children. While they love to be active and run around outside, Labrador Retrievers are also extremely obedient and loyal when trained properly.

Golden Retriever

medium_203795168

As with the Labrador Retriever, the Golden Retriever is a playful and active breed. PetMD cited the breed as one of the easiest to train and noted the way in which it approaches learning new things with enthusiasm. Also, the Golden’s mild temperament and love for human companionship makes it an excellent family pet. Any Golden Retriever owner can attest to the loyalty and obedient nature this breed possesses.

The Collie

medium_7733679734

Made famous thanks to Lassie, the Collie is another great family pet breed and it are known for its intelligence and gentle disposition. Collies are also very alert and graceful, traits that warrant their historical reputation as herding dogs.  Collies are impressionable dogs that love to please their owners and get along well with children. This combination of traits has led the Collie to become one of the most common canine pets.

The Bulldog

medium_4684641648

The Bulldog is another breed that gets along well with children and is known for patience and affection. Its sturdy build makes it an excellent dog for playing with young children and its calm nature is very suitable for a household pet. In general, the Bulldog is a dog that loves being around people and will be friendly to your family, friends and even strangers.

How to Photograph Pets

Why It Is Important To Know How To Take Good Pictures Of Your Pet

Here is a picture of our Maxxie, taken in 2002 by a professional photographer.

We ordered pizza one night on my wife’s birthday, and I put my business card inside a “bin”. Next thing you know, $300.00 later with our ‘Free Pictures’ and other pictures, we finally had some family pictures .. me, my wife and Maxxie! Maxxie was the most photogenic of the lot, as if you can’t tell! I call this picture .. “Maxxie – Formal – Smiling”

May 2002 - Hello .. This is another formal picture of me, smiling

Here is a picture of our Sophie, with my current digital camera

I had a reasonable nice camera for taking pictures, but it wasn’t too clear on the detail and on the closeups. So, in 2005 I went out and purchased one of the Olympus Stylus 300 Digital camera’s at Future Shop and started to take pictures. Well, I forgot about those double-flashes the camera does (to prepare or reduce the Red-Eye effect) … and this is the picture I took. I call this picture .. “Sophie – Oops – Yawning”

Sophie Biiiig Yaaaaawn

Believe It Or Not ..

… I try to take pictures every day of our two pet papillon dogs Maxxie and Sophie, and of our cat Zeussie Pussy
Cat .. so I can upload pictures onto our Pet site .. http://PapillonLvr.com/blog/ . Unfortunately, not all of them come out okay and I’ve been either neglecting to put up ANY pictures at all on the site, or I have been posting some nice pictures of Papillon dogs found on Flickr or YouTube.

You can see all the pictures of our pet Papillon dogs over at http://PapillonLvr.com/blog/

So Why Not Learn How To Take Great Pictures Yourself?

Darren Rowse of Digital Photography School writes some great tips on How to Photograph Pets.

Of his Top 10 tips … I like his last tip the best…

10. Catch them Unawares – Posed shots can be fun and effective but one thing I love to do (whether it be with animals or people) is to photograph them candidly paparazzi style. I have very fond memories of stalking a friend’s dog as he played in a back yard one day. I took shots while he dug up flowers, as he buried a bone, as he fell chased a bee around and ask he sat contentedly with his head sticking out of his dog house. The whole time I photographed him he was barely aware of my presence so the shots were very natural without me distracting the dog from his ‘business’.

If you have a camera .. I suggest that you browse the Digital Photography School for many tips and techniques how to get better pictures out of your camera .. so you don’t have to hire a professional to take good pictures of your pets. And .. does it really help? Well, I still have a pretty basic camera, and I’m still a lousy picture taker .. but, it’s not that I don’t recognize a good photo opportunity if I see one!

For instance, if I want to take pictures of Maxxie and Sophie .. all I have to say is .. “Papillon Pictures, Papillon Pictures” .. and, then they stop and pose for me, most likely looking away from the camera and the flash. Using Darren Rowse’s “Paparazzi” style tip .. I sometimes get cool pictures .. like, the following – watching our dogs roll over!

Maxxie puts on a great show and rolls over on command!

Sophie rolls over on command, but is so fast it’s hard to take a great picture!

The Miniature Schnauzer

The Miniature Schnauzer

by Sidy Boy

Sam and Simon The Miniature Schnauzer is derived from the Standard Schnauzer and is said to have come from mixing Affenpinchers and Poodles with small Standards. The Mini’s were exhibited as a distinct breed as early as 1899, and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1926.

Miniature Schnauzers should be no less than 12 inches in height, and no more than 14 inches. They are sturdily built, nearly square in proportion of body length to height with plenty of bone. The weight should range between 14 to 18 pounds depending on height.

Schnauzers may be several colors. Salt and Pepper is the most common, though blacks and black & Silvers are being seen in increasing numbers. Their “Show Coat” differs from their “Pet Coat.” The show coat is a thick wiry coat, which is obtained through stripping the dog-pulling the hair out with a stripping knife. The pet coat is a much softer clipped coat. The breed has a soft undercoat, and if the dog is clipped, in time only the undercoat will remain. Pet owners are not recommended to try for a show coat on their dogs-not only is it very expensive to have done ($150+ each time), but it may be very difficult to find a groomer who is knowledgeable enough about the breed to do it. Having your pet clipped is best, and this should be done on a regular basis. The grooming schedule for a Miniature Schnauzer is normally every 4 to 8 weeks, depending on their hair growth. They will need to be combed and brushed in between full groomings to help prevent matting of their furnishings, and especially their beards. Just brushing the dog is not enough- they must be combed as well or their long furnishings will matt.

Miniature Schnauzers are hardy, healthy, intelligent, and fond of children. They were developed as a small farm dog, used as ratters. Their small size has permitted them to adapt easy to city living, though they still do quite well in the country, and can cover a large amount of ground with little tiring. They make wonderful family companions, and are extremely easy to train. They do well not only in conformation events, but also in obedience and agility.

Health concerns in the breed include Urolithiasis which is bladder stones. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) which is a degenerative disease of the retinal visual cells which leads to blindness. Cataracts which is Lens opacity that may in part or in total affect one or both eyes. Blindness results when cataracts are complete and in both eyes.

Panosteitis which is a developmental problem associated with too rapid growth. Lameness can occur in one limb or over time in all limbs. Typically the dog will stand with one leg up- a day or so later the dog will hold another leg up. The pain associated with Pano will often switch legs several times. Treatment usually involves resting and sometimes an arthritis type pain medication for a few days. This is not life threatening nor will it affect the dog throughout it’s lifetime.

Other concerns are immune dysfunction’s, heart problems and diabetes. For a full list and description of Miniature Schnauzer health concerns, please click here.

A reputable breeder will screen for inherited health problems and will be able to discuss if there has been any problems in their lines.

NOTICE: Despite what you may see on some websites, the only Miniature Schnauzers recognized by the AKC are blacks, salt and pepper and black and silvers. White Schnauzers (as well as the 3 AKC permitted colors) are recognized by the FCI. As with all breeds, please screen breeders carefully to assure you are getting a healthy, well balanced dog. There are many breeders out there only looking to make some money and will fool you into believing that their dogs are of the proper type. We have personally seen some “badly bred” Schnauzers that barely resemble the breed at all, and you must realize that when they lack one quality, they will most likely lack others- and health and temperament are extremely important qualities! Quality is important- proper structure, health and temperament. I’ve personally seen many illbred dogs who were loaded with health problems, and were noisy, and biters, so please be careful!

Taken From:

http://www.sidyboysfoolin.com/MiniSch.html

__________
The Wonderful World of Sidy Boy
www.sidyboysfoolin.com

Alaskan Malamute Complete Profile

Alaskan Malamute Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Alaskan Malamute

Key Facts:

Size: Giant
Height: 58 – 71 cm (23 – 28 inches)
Weight: 38 – 56 kg (85 – 125 lb)
Life Span: 13 years
Grooming: Medium
Exercise: Demanding
Feeding: Demanding
Temperament: Sociable & loyal
Country of Origin: North America (Alaska)
AKC Group: Working

Temperament:
The Alaskan Malamute is dignified, friendly and affectionate. Alaskan Malamutes are not one-man dogs and are friendly to all. They are intelligent and able to be trained for a variety of jobs, such as guide dogs. Alaskan Malamute’s make very loyal and devoted companions, but can be aggressive towards other dogs. Alaskan Malamutes have tremendous strength and stamina and therefore require an owner with experience and strength to apply the brakes.

Grooming:
The coat of the Alaskan Malamute does not require much in the way of grooming. During moulting it is best to use a coarse comb with a double row of teeth to remove dead hairs.

Exercise:
They require a great deal of exercise on a daily basis. Alaskan Malamute’s need to stay on a lead unless they are firmly under control as they’re liable to run off.

History:
Alaskan Malamutes got their name from a native tribe in the Artic called that Mahlemuts. Their origin is rather obscure, but it is generally believed that they have been with the eskimos for two to three thousand years. The Alaskan Indians found Alaskan Malamutes invaluable for their ability in droving, herding, hunting and hauling heavy sleds.

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Hardy, compact and well-built.
Colour: Usually light grey or black and white.
Coat: The outercoat is thick and coarse and the undercoat is woolly, dense and oily.
Tail: Full and furry – carried over the back in a curved shape.
Ears: Small, upright and triangular.
Body: Powerful, well-developed, deep chest, straight back sloping gently to the hips with a very muscular loin.

Additional Comments:

Alaskan Malamutes are delightful and challenging with their extreme strength and stamina. They require training from early puppyhood to be controllable in a household situation.

~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/alaskan_malamute/

Boston Terrier Complete Profile

Boston Terrier Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Boston Terrier

Key Facts:

Size: Small – medium
Height: 37- 42cm (15 – 17inches)
Weight: Wide variation. But usually 8 kg (18 lb).
Life Span: 15 years
Grooming: Simple
Exercise: Undemanding
Feeding: Undemanding
Temperament: Determined & even-tempered
Country of Origin: England/United States
AKC Group: Non-Sporting
Other Names: Boston Bull

Temperament:
The Boston Terrier is even-tempered, intelligent, gentle and lively. Boston Terriers are playful and affectionate with their owners. They are good with children who can appreciate their clown-like antics. Boston Terriers are intelligent and quick to learn, making obedience training easy and straighforward. The Boston Terrier is strong-willed and boisterous, but they make a thoroughly good-natured family dog.

Grooming:
Grooming is minimal with the Boston Terrier. Occasionally run a brush or smooth glove over the coat and keep the ears clean and claws trimmed. The facial creases may need some attention from time to time with a special lotion for this area.

Exercise:
Exercise for Boston Terriers is undemanding. They have no desire for long walks, but do like to go with their owner/family everywhere. They enjoy playing.

History:
Boston Terriers evolved from cross-breeding in America between Bulldogs and Bull Terriers. They were once known as the American Bull Terrier. Their name was changed to Boston Terrier in order to seperate them from the already established Bull Terrier. The name ‘Boston Terrier’ was in honour of the city where their breed type was first developed. The progenitors of this breed weighed as much as 27kg (60lb), while today one sees the Boston Terrier around 6.8kg with a limit of up to 11.4kg.

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Intelligent expression, confident graceful gait and well built.
Colour: Preferably brindle with white on designated parts of the body. Black and white is allowable.
Coat: Short, shiny, fine and smooth in texture.
Tail: Set low, short, tapering and is either straight or screw-shape.
Ears: Small, erect and fine. Can sometimes be cropped.
Body: Sloping shoulders, broad chest, prominent ribs, short back and muscular, short loin.

Additional Comments:

There are associated problems with Boston Terriers including inherited eye conditions and their eyes are more prone to injuries. However these difficulties are now less of a problem than in the past. Boston Terriers also tend to snore loudly and have regular flatulence.

Sometimes natural births of this breed are impossible, due to the large head size of the puppies. Therefore caesarian sections are quite common for delivery Boston Terriers.

~~~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/boston_terrier/

American Bulldog Complete Profile

American Bulldog Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
American Bulldog

Key Facts:

Size: Large
Height: 48 – 71 cm (19 – 28 inches)
Weight: 30 – 58 kg (65 – 130 lb)
Life Span: 12 years
Grooming: Minimal
Exercise: Demanding
Feeding: Medium
Temperament: Fearless & confident
Country of Origin: United States
AKC Group: Not registered
Other Names: Old Country Bulldog

Temperament:
The American Bulldog is confident, gentle, fearless, determined and protective. American Bulldogs should not be overly aggressive with other dogs depsite their self-confidence and bravery. These dogs genuinely love children and have strong protective instincts towards their handler and family. To prevent American Bulldogs from becoming overly protective or dominant they need to be socialized with a variety of animals, people and situations during puppyhood. They tend to be reserved towards strangers and make excellent watchdogs and guard dogs. American Bulldogs make truly devoted and loving pets when they receive proper training and socialization from an early age.

Grooming:
American Bulldogs don’t need much grooming except when the coat is shedding. During these times the coat should be brushed regularly with a firm bristle brush to remove the dead hairs.

Exercise:
American Bulldogs are extremely energetic and need plenty of exercise. They enjoy long walks, jogging, playing catch or participating in agility trials. If American Bulldogs receive adequate daily exercise they should be calm when indoors.

History:
In the 1800s a number of European immigrants brought the original type of Bulldog from England to the United States. These Bulldogs had been used for bull baiting in England until this brutal sport became illegal. As a result these dogs disappeared from Britain and made their way to America with working class immigrants. These dogs were used to work with livestock, but almost became extinct by the end of World War II. It was John Johnson, Alan Scott and some other dedicated breeders who managed to revive this breed and develop the American Bulldog from them.

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Sturdy, athletic, powerful, muscular and hardy.
Colour: Any colour, colour pattern, or combination of colours is acceptable, except for solid black, solid blue, and tricolor (white with patches of black and tan).
Coat: Short, close, and stiff to touch.
Tail: Set low, tapering and can either be natural or docked (a natural tail is preferred).
Ears: Set high, of medium size and may be dropped, semi-pricked or rose-shaped. The ears may be cropped but natural ears are preferred.
Body: The chest is deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs. The back is broad and muscular with the topline slightly declining downwards. The loin is short, broad, and slightly arched, blending into a moderately sloping croup. The flank is moderately tucked up and firm.

Additional Comments:

The American Bulldog is higher on the leg and more agile than the English Bulldog. Some of these dogs are reportedly able to leap six feet or more into the air.

The American Bulldog should not be confused with uniquely different breeds such as the American Staffordshire Terrier or the American Pit Bull Terrier.

~~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/american_bulldog/

Old English Sheepdog Complete Profile

Old English Sheepdog Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Old English Sheepdog

Key Facts:

Size: Large
Height: Above 54 cm (21 inches)
Weight: About 30 kg (66 lb)
Life Span: 13 years
Grooming: Very demanding
Exercise: Medium
Feeding: Medium
Temperament: Friendly & outgoing
Country of Origin: England
AKC Group: Herding
Other Names: Bobtail

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Ambling walk, shaggy, strong and compact.
Colour: Grey, grizzle, blue or blue merle, with or without white markings.
Coat: The outer coat is shaggy, hard in texture and harsh. The undercoat is waterproof.
Tail: Commonly docked completely or from the first joint.
Ears: Small and carried flat against the side of the head.
Body: The body is quite short and compact. The loins are strong and slightly arched and the shoulders are sloping. The chest is well developed and the brisket is deep and full.

Temperament:
Trustworthy, bold, agile, active and good-natured. Old English Sheepdogs love being part of a family and are a very adaptable breed. They socialize well with other dogs, children and family pets. They greet strangers warmly and are not particularly alert. They can be boisterous in nature and will join in every possible activity with great enthusiasm. Old English Sheepdogs want to please their handlers and rarely show dominant behaviour, however training can be slow.

Grooming:
Grooming with these dogs is very demanding. They require regular, thorough brushing as least once a week. When the coat is moulting its quite possible that a rubbish bag full of hair can be collected after a brush. If the coat is left ungroomed for a length of time it will quickly become matted to a degree that leaves little alternative but to clip. Old English Sheepdogs that are being shown should have a higher rear than the shoulders, which is achieved when the hair is groomed upwards. It is also important that the ears are kept free of dirt and hair and that the nails are trimmed. The excess hair between the pads of the feet should also be clipped short.

Exercise:
Old English Sheepdogs need a fair amount of exercise, but will not grumble if a day goes by without any. They love playing with a ball or similar activities and are best suited for rural homes with a spacious backyard. This breed can do well in various dog sports.

History:
This breed has not been around as long as many other dog breeds. It is thought that they evolved from the Bearded Collie in the early 19th century and possibly with crosses from the Briard and the Hungarian sheepdog. Farmers commonly docked this breeds tails in the early 19th century to claim exemption from English taxes. This was because the longer haired ‘luxury’ dogs only qualified as working dogs if the tails were docked.

Additional Comments:

The Old English Sheepdogs have been nicknamed the Bobtail, because their tails are customarily docked.
If the coat is not properly cared for and well-groomed, it can cause skin parasites.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/old_english_sheepdog/

Maltese Complete Profile

Maltese Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Maltese

Key Facts:

Size: Small
Height: Under 25 cm (10 inches)
Weight: 1.8 – 2.7 kg (4 – 6 lb)
Life Span: 14 years
Grooming: Very demanding
Exercise: Undemanding
Feeding: Undemanding
Temperament: Loyal & sensitive
Country of Origin: Italy/Malta
AKC Group: Toy
Other Names: Bichon Maltais

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Elegant, glossy-white and petite.
Colour: Pure white with slight lemon markings permitted. The nose, eyerims and pads are all black.
Coat: Long, dense, silky, straight and heavy. The average length is 23 cm (9 inches) and the hair hangs down on either side of a straight parting running down the centre of the back.
Tail: Tapering, carried in a large arch over the back and finishing with a long plume.
Ears: Set high, flat, almost triangular, well feathered with long hair reaching to the shoulders.
Body: The body is square and short with a straight topline. The belly is rather low and the ribs are rounded.

Temperament:
Alert, lively, loyal and sensitive. Although Maltese appear delicate at first sight, they are definitely not sissy dogs. They thrive on human companionship and accept and equally love all members of their household. They get along with other household pets and children without any difficulties. Maltese are relatively straight-forward to train and tend to learn quickly.

Grooming:
Maltese require a substantial amount of grooming with their long, silky coats. They need daily brushing and combing and regular washing. The red tear stains can be reduced or removed with special lotions specifically designed for the area. Some owners chose to keep the coat trimmed short if the dog is only a pet and not being shown. Maltese typically have the hair between the eyes tied up in a top knot. Owners who have show dogs often oil the hair and wind it up in curling papers to prevent it from splitting.

Exercise:
These small dogs usually adapt themselves to the family activities to fulfill their exercise needs. They will happily join their owner for a long walk though.

History:
It is believed that these dogs existed and were highly valued as far back as 3500 BC. During the first century AD they were known as ‘The Roman Ladies Dogs’ and were used in paintings and poems. In 1570 Dr. Caius discussed their virtues and described how women carried them in their bosoms, arms and took them into their beds. The Maltese has been protected and spoilt for centuries. They are said to be one of the oldest European breeds and during the time of Henry VIII they were immediate favourites of the English Court.

Additional Comments:

Maltese make delightful companions for all ages, but are not suitable for owners who don’t have the time for their extensive grooming.

~~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/maltese/

Labrador Retriever Complete Profile

Labrador Retriever Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Labrador Retriever

Key Facts:

Size: Large
Height: 54 – 57 cm (21.5 – 22.5 inches)
Weight: 25 – 35 kg (55 – 77 lb)
Life Span: 15 years
Grooming: Easy
Exercise: Demanding
Feeding: Reasonable
Temperament: Friendly & intelligent
Country of Origin: England
AKC Group: Sporting

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Solid, strongly built and friendly.
Colour: Black, yellow or liver/chocolate.
Coat: Straight, dense, short, hard and weather resistant.
Tail: Tapering and carried fairly high in action but should never curl over the back.
Ears: Set far back, pendant and hanging close to the cheek.
Body: The chest is deep and wide with well sprung ribs. The back is long and level with a wide loin. And the shoulders are long and oblique.

Temperament:
Active, gentle, easy-going, bold and intelligent. Labrador Retrievers are very popular household pets as they are people-orientated and extremely devoted to their family. They get on well with children, strangers and other dogs. Their intelligence makes them very trainable and obedient. These dogs are capable of taking all the knocks of a rough-and-tumble family and their even-temperament means they never take offence at any insult.

Grooming:
The coat of the Labrador Retriever is easily maintained with an occasional brush. More attention is needed when the coat is moulting.

Exercise:
These retrievers adapt themselves to their family, but they also need additional exercise such as long walks or playing and retrieving in the water. They need regular exercise to prevent them from becoming too boisterous and exuberant.

Feeding:
Labrador Retrievers can consume any quantity of food and need rationing to avoid them becoming overweight.

History:
The labrador comes from Newfoundland and is thought to have evolved from the St. Johns dog and a water spaniel. It was in the 1800s that these dogs were used by fisherman for retrieving hooked fish from the water. Eventually some of these Labradors arrived in Britain and their qualities were retained through crossing them with other retrievers. This cross-breeding stopped once the breed was high in numbers and quality to maintain the desired breed type.

Additional Comments:

Labrador Retrievers are multi-talented dogs as they are used as guide dogs and also for drug searching.
A distinct characteristic of this breed is the tail. It is often called the ‘otter tail’ with its relatively short length and thick covering of hair.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/labrador_retriever/

King Charles Spaniel Complete Profile

King Charles Spaniel Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
King Charles Spaniel

Key Facts:

Size: Small
Height: About 25 cm (10 inches)
Weight: 3.6 – 6.3 kg (8 – 14 lb)
Life Span: 13 years
Grooming: Medium
Exercise: Undemanding
Feeding: Medium
Temperament: Gentle & affectionate
Country of Origin: England
AKC Group: Toy
Other Names: English Toy Spaniel

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Stocky, compact and well proportioned.
Colour: Black/tan, ruby (red), tricolour or blenheim (red and white).
Coat: Silky, long, straight, good feathering with or without a slight wave.
Tail: Well feathered, lower than the topline and may be docked.
Ears: Set low, long, well feathered and hanging by the cheeks.
Body: The chest is wide and deep and the back is short and level. The shoulders are well laid back and the fore and hindquarters are well angulated.

Temperament:
Easy-going, affectionate and happy. King Charles Spaniels get on well with children, other dogs and strangers. They are suited for apartment living and enjoy being with their family and receiving plenty of attention. They are intelligent and learn quickly when being trained. These small dogs are sociable and adaptable which makes them ideal family pets.

Grooming:
The coat of the King Charles Spaniel should be brushed twice per week, especially in the areas more prone to tangling such as the chest, behind the ears and between the legs. The facial creases should be wiped with lotion (for this particular area) from time to time and the ear canals checked for dirt or wax.

Exercise:
The King Charles Spaniel adapts itself to the family activities for it’s daily exercise needs. They don’t demand a great deal of exercise and are content with being part of the family outings.

History:
This breed shares the same ancestry as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and were popular in both England and Europe around 3-4 centuries ago. The English breeders preferred shorter muzzles on the spaniels and through selective breeding (possibly with the Japanese Chin) the head shape changed so that the muzzle appeared relatively flat. Later in the 1920s, breeders wanted to restore the longer shaped muzzles of the original King Charles Spaniel, which resulted in two distinct types. The re-established longer muzzled variety had the name ‘Cavalier’ added to the title of King Charles Spaniel.

Additional Comments:

The King Charles Spaniel is similar to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel except that it has a shorter nose and a more domed head.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

About the Author

This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/king_charles_spaniel/