Posts Tagged Poodle

Getting To Know The Poodle

By Dan Stevens

Getting to know your dog starts by getting to know its breed, and that includes getting a better idea about its appearance, personality, and health requirements. Here’s what you need to know about the Poodle:

The Poodle is considered one of the smartest dogs in the world. In addition, this breed is exceptionally easy to train. What many people do not know is that the Poodle has been around for centuries, originally being a large dog used for hunting. The exact origin is controversial, some historians believing this breed comes from Germany while others believe it comes from Denmark, France, or even Piedmont. Regardless, the French are now considered the official claim to fame regarding this breed, which is why sometimes the dog is referred to as the “French Poodle”.

The Poodle, being a descent of the Hungarian Water Hound and Barbet, loves water. Therefore, the actual name is a derivative of the German word “Pudel, which translates to “one who plays in water.” With exceptional swimming and retrieving skills, this breed was at one time used to fetch waterfowl. To keep the dog from becoming waterlogged, giving it more flexibility to swim, the hunters would clip the coat, leaving only hair around the legs as protection from the environment. Today, we still see the Poodle clipped in this traditional fashion.

Realizing just how smart the Poodle was, the French began using the breed to perform in the circus, which led even further to popularity. The large, Standard Poodle was eventually bred down to what we see more of today as the Miniature and Toy Poodle. Keep in mind that the Standard variety is still available although not as widely chosen for a pet. In addition to excellent family additions, the Poodle is a great show dog and performer. When showing, all three varieties are scored the same.

The Standard Poodle is the largest of the three varieties, followed by the Miniature version and then the Toy version. All three are graceful, lively, and elegant. The Poodle is also shaped much the same, only different according to size. This breed is also a part of many hybrids to include Cockapoo (Cocker Spaniel and Poodle) and the latest, the Labradoodle (Labrador Retriever and Poodle).

Physical Appearance

All poodles have long ears that are flat and wide. The eyes are almond-shaped and the face generally has an alert expression. On this particular breed, you would find the head to be slightly rounded and the teeth have a scissor type bite. The Poodle’s feet are oval and webbed, making it a powerful swimmer. Depending on the owner, some will have the tail docked and dew claws removed.

A great benefit to owning a Poodle is that this dog does not shed. Therefore, people with allergies, respiratory problems, or even people with a disability that would find cleaning up after a dog difficult would love owning this breed. The hair of the Poodle is another important aspect. The hair is curly and therefore, must be brushed and clipped on regular schedules.

Typically, a Poodle would be one color such as brown, black, white, blue, apricot, or gray but you will also find parti-colors, sometimes referred to as “phantom colors”, which means black and red markings. While the hair on the Poodle’s body is tightly curled, you may find your dog’s ears curly or straight. When visiting a dog groomer, you will find there to be many different cut options. However, for show purposes, just three cuts are acceptable. These include:

1. Puppy Clip
2. Continental (Lion Clip)
3. English Saddle Clip

If you plan to use your Poodle as a working dog and not a show dog, then you could go with any clip you like. However, most often, the hair would be kept short as a means of reducing tangles and water remaining on the animal if used for fishing or hunting. Unfortunately, if a Poodle is not properly clipped, the hair can cause serious problems. As the hair grows, it begins to cord. When this happens, it can pull on the skin, causing lesions, sores, infection, and so on. At this point, the only solution is to have the coat completely shaven off.

To give you an idea as to size, the original Standard Poodle would measure more an 15 inches at the withers, the Miniature Poodle 11 to 14 inches, and the Toy, less than 11 inches. Additionally, a Toy Poodle must be 10 pounds or less to qualify for this class. Keep in mind that the FCI and AKC have slightly different regulations so you would need to follow closely to the one you wanted to use for show.

Temperament and Personality

The Poodle is an exceptionally bright dog. The breed is active and alert, loving, and loyal. In addition, the Poodle does very well with children if socialized when young and in most cases, handles other animals quite well. This particular breed will often go to great lengths to please its master and many times, is a one-person type dog. Although the Poodle is typically mellow, they can become bored and mischievous. Therefore, it is important to exercise your pet and spend some quality time playing.

You will also find the Poodle to be a sensitive dog. In fact, when caught chewing on something or getting into something he or she is not supposed to be in, you may even notice slight embarrassment. This breed is comical and makes a great watchdog. The one thing to remember is that if you find your particular Poodle is a little on the high-strung side, proper training, and socialization will reduce the risk of sapping dramatically. Then, if you have smaller children, they would need to be taught how to respect this breed, meaning no sitting on the dog, and no pulling of the ears or tail, etc.

Health

Poodles will often have hyperactive tear ducts, meaning they have streaks of brown running down the eye area. Sometimes, keeping the eye clean with a cotton ball dampened with water is enough but if you find the problem to be constant, your veterinarian may prefer to check for a clog, which can be corrected. Then as mentioned, it is imperative that a Poodle have proper grooming. When buying this breed, the expense and time associated with grooming should be considered.

Most Poodles will live to around 14 to 16 years of age. Although typically a healthy breed, you should know that some health risks exist, which vary depending on the variety. For instance, things such as Entropion, Cataracts, Intervertebral Disc Degeneration, Epilepsy, Legg-Perthes, Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Luxating Patella, Urolithiasis, and Trichiasis are all possibilities for the Miniature and Toy Poodle.

Then for the Standard Poodle, the above-mentioned risks exist along with small potential for Canine Hip Dysplasia, Addison’s Disease, Gastric Torsion, Sebaceous Adenitis, and Von Willebrand’s Disease, a hereditary protein deficiency. In addition, all varieties of the breed are predisposed for mammary tumors. With good care and regular checkups, a Poodle should live a long, healthy life.

About the Author: Daniel Stevens is the renowned dog trainer and author of SitStayFetch, a leading dog training guide having sold over 21,000 copies. See http://www.kingdomofpets.com/dogobediencetraining/dogbreeds/poodle.php for more on dog breeds.

Standard Poodles – The People Pleaser

Standard Poodles – The People Pleaser

By Sandy Riordan

I did a lot of research before getting another dog after our English Cockers passed away. I was attracted to Standard Poodles because of their intelligence, temperament and ease of training. They are known to be good family dogs as well as a good watchdog. They also seem to get along very well with other animals as well, sometimes even to the point of being protective of smaller animals.

I have the honor of being owned by three Standard Poodles at the moment, Meg, Bob, and Charley. All three of them have excellent personalities, although they are three totally different personalities.

There is a misconception that females make a better pet and have better personalities, which I too thought was the case at first! Meg, our female Poodle, is very calm, reserved and dignified. She is very loving, but on her own terms. She also tends to be somewhat stubborn at times! Sometimes she acts like, “I can’t be bothered doing that!”

Our males, Bob and Charley, are real clowns! They are more exuberant and want to play all the time. They are more of a “get in your face” type of dog, always looking for attention and affection.

Our Standard Poodles have excellent temperaments and seem to get along with everyone, kids and adults. My husband and I have made it a point to start socializing them at a very early age, to get them used to people, places, sounds and riding in the car.

Whenever there is a festival or outdoor event in town, we always take them and they are always a big hit. Everyone wants to pet them, take pictures and ask us all about them. They love the attention! They’re not afraid of crowds or loud noises.

They seem to be able to read your body language and emotions and I swear they can tell when you are sad or happy and react accordingly! When I’m sad, they come and put their head on my lap and look at me with those big sad eyes! When I’m happy, they jump around smiling and wagging their pompom tails.

They can also be quite humorous at times as well. Our male Bob’s favorite spot is sleeping on the couch (not a good thing I know), but Meg and Charley were already on the couch. He looked at them as if to say, “Hey, that’s my spot,” and thought about climbing in between them for a moment. He then looked at a small 16 x 16 inch pillow that Charley had thrown off the couch and decided to try and lay down on it. Now this is a 75 pound large male poodle! He went round and round in circles on top of this pillow and finally tried to curl up in a ball on top of the pillow. It was hilarious!

The Standard Poodle temperament is that of a people pleaser. They will go out of their way to make their humans happy. They generally bond to everyone in their human family instead of one person exclusively.

As long as you have a sense of humor and don’t mind a dog that outsmarts you once in a while, a Standard Poodle may be a good choice for you!

Sandy Riordan
Creator of Standard Poodles USA
Everything you need and want to know about Standard Poodles!

http://www.standardpoodlesusa.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sandy_Riordan

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

Some History of Designer Breeds and The Problem

By Steve Allison

Although the concept is by no means new; many people are discovering that some of the latest breeds of super dogs are not as great as their breeders would have you believe.

Of the “designer dog club” the ‘Labradoodle’ is probably the most well known. The ‘Labradoodle’ was originally bred for sight impaired individuals who had severe reactions to dog’s fur. This new hybrid aimed to combine the intelligence of the Labrador with a non-shedding poodle. However you may or may not have a puppy that will be non-shedding. Labradoodles have been around for over 20 years and are gaining recognition.

But the term ‘designer mutts’ can be used to describe any number of endless combinations of dogs who have been bred for particular valued qualities. Ever thought about owning a Dorgi? That’s a cross between a Corgi and a Dachshund. How about a Puggle? That’s a cross between a Beagle and a Puggle. There are many variations on breeds with poodles now too. This often results in comical names – the Corgi Poo; or the Shih Poo, the variations are endless.

Hypoallergenic, intelligent and some say healthier than average – these dogs are becoming popular throughout the world. Yet the American Kennel Club refuses to accept these new breeds. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes 153 breeds at present; and says that these dogs don’t meet their criteria.

The American Hybrid Club seems to be the answer for the breeders who are rallying to have their new combinations recognized. They argue that in fact all dog breeds exist as a result of some kind of experimentation with mixing breeds.

There are many inherent dangers associated with mixing breeds that would never have bred naturally. The main problem is that you never really know exactly what you will be getting. Most often you can learn a great deal about a dog by the look and temperament of their parents – but with these dogs there is no way to tell if you will end up with a mouse sized dog – or a dog the size of a small donkey.

And it’s not just looks. You might be unpleasantly surprised to find that your new puppy has the temperament of a hostile dictator; or worse is very aggressive. These are serious faults; especially if you intend to introduce your cute new ‘Schnoodle’ (a mixture of a Schnauzer and a poodle) to your kids you never know what might happen.

Is that really a chance you want to take?

Also, these new breeds are by no means considered cheap. You could get an equivalent mix at a shelter for free. But some breeders are charging thousands of dollars for dogs they cannot personally guarantee. They claim these dogs take the best of both breeds. But there is an equal risk that the dog can end up with the worst from breeds. This seems like a staggering chance to take.

In an attempt to create super dog these breeders are using breeding techniques that seem strangely unnatural. Certain Bulldog combinations always require artificial insemination for successful mating to occur. And you can’t count on Caesar section. Many of the crossbreeds are bred for profit. Unscrupulous practices which lead to fashion item dogs will create a host of problems for future generations.

If you have your heart set on a designer dog bear in mind you might end up paying more in vet bills. Your puppy will need a vast array of tests.

There are many well-established variations. Purebred dogs have a proven track record. You can say with greater certainty what your Labrador will look like. You will also have a greater idea of what kinds of health problems to expect in your Dachshund.

You can also find adult crossbreeds in a number of places. Adult dogs are often a good choice for families who have children or who need to be sure of the dog’s temperament. And of course giving a loving home to a homeless dog is always a good thing. If you have your heart set on one of the new crossbreeds; try to learn what you can before deciding on the particular dog or cross.

Steve Allison is a third generation of professional dog breeders along with his brother Gary. It all started with his grandparents in 1970 with the Boston Terriers and has expanded to Maltese, Yorkshire Terriers, Pugs, Shih Tzu’s and Pomeranians. He is also actively involved with dog rescue and has a website that showcases the puppies they occasionally has for sale at All My Puppies Online Steve is also the co-author of two consumer guides, Carpet Secrets and Moving Secrets Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steve_Allison

Toy Poodle, About the Breed

Toy Poodle, About the Breed

By Agust Hauksson

A toy poodle is a type of dog, one that is small, lively and that will become part of the family when welcomed into your home. The toy poodle is one that can be black, white or brown, and true toy poodles are not going to be multi colored or mixed breeds. The hair on the toy poodle is one that is curly, very curly and often times shaved over the body to keep the hair from becoming messy. This is a dog that has long and floppy ears, sometimes they look a little too long for the small head that this dog has. Many toy poodles are bred for show, and with the right help can win all types of awards and prizes for their owners.

The toy poodle is one that is known for being smart, and intelligent. They are highly responsive to their owners, listening to commands, and listening to demands. The toy poodle that is neglected will seek out love and companionship of another dog, another person, or another person with more authority in the home. Giving this type of dog a lot of attention and interaction with children while they are puppies will help groom the dog for a family life that will be happy and social with the entire family.

The toy poodle that you don’t take a lot of time to train when it is a puppy will bark more often. The toy poodle that is trained only to bark at strangers will do well when you have company and when you are in the house and someone comes to the door. The puppy given interaction with children will learn not to bark or bite children and will play along with the ball, play fetch, and go for nice long walks.

The toy poodle does get its name for being such a small looking almost fake looking dog. The dog will grow to be about ten inches high and will weight no more than ten pounds. For a dog, that is small. For a dog, that grows to be just about ten inches high, it is important for it to be groomed well, and to keep its hair cut, because mud, puddles, and rain can cause knots and mess in the hair if not properly cared for.

The toy poodle is one that can be found bred to be pure or mixed with other types of dogs and even other types of poodles. The curly hair of the poodle can be long when it is mixed with a longhaired dog, just as it can grow to be taller if it is bred with a dog that is a little taller than the small poodle known as the toy poodle.

If you are searching for a pure bred poodle, look for papers that will come from the American kennel club that will give you the full history and ancestry of the puppy you are about to purchase.

Copyright 2006 – Agust Hauksson. Agust is a regular contributor of articles to many online publications. Find more great information at: http://www.toy-poodle.info/ and http://www.dogboarding-guide.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Agust_Hauksson

Standard Poodles – The People Pleaser

Standard Poodles – The People Pleaser

By Sandy Riordan

I did a lot of research before getting another dog after our English Cockers passed away. I was attracted to Standard Poodles because of their intelligence, temperament and ease of training. They are known to be good family dogs as well as a good watchdog. They also seem to get along very well with other animals as well, sometimes even to the point of being protective of smaller animals.

I have the honor of being owned by three Standard Poodles at the moment, Meg, Bob, and Charley. All three of them have excellent personalities, although they are three totally different personalities.

There is a misconception that females make a better pet and have better personalities, which I too thought was the case at first! Meg, our female Poodle, is very calm, reserved and dignified. She is very loving, but on her own terms. She also tends to be somewhat stubborn at times! Sometimes she acts like, “I can’t be bothered doing that!”

Our males, Bob and Charley, are real clowns! They are more exuberant and want to play all the time. They are more of a “get in your face” type of dog, always looking for attention and affection.

Our Standard Poodles have excellent temperaments and seem to get along with everyone, kids and adults. My husband and I have made it a point to start socializing them at a very early age, to get them used to people, places, sounds and riding in the car.

Whenever there is a festival or outdoor event in town, we always take them and they are always a big hit. Everyone wants to pet them, take pictures and ask us all about them. They love the attention! They’re not afraid of crowds or loud noises.

They seem to be able to read your body language and emotions and I swear they can tell when you are sad or happy and react accordingly! When I’m sad, they come and put their head on my lap and look at me with those big sad eyes! When I’m happy, they jump around smiling and wagging their pompom tails.

They can also be quite humorous at times as well. Our male Bob’s favorite spot is sleeping on the couch (not a good thing I know), but Meg and Charley were already on the couch. He looked at them as if to say, “Hey, that’s my spot,” and thought about climbing in between them for a moment. He then looked at a small 16 x 16 inch pillow that Charley had thrown off the couch and decided to try and lay down on it. Now this is a 75 pound large male poodle! He went round and round in circles on top of this pillow and finally tried to curl up in a ball on top of the pillow. It was hilarious!

The Standard Poodle temperament is that of a people pleaser. They will go out of their way to make their humans happy. They generally bond to everyone in their human family instead of one person exclusively.

As long as you have a sense of humor and don’t mind a dog that outsmarts you once in a while, a Standard Poodle may be a good choice for you!

Sandy Riordan
Creator of Standard Poodles USA
Everything you need and want to know about Standard Poodles!

http://www.standardpoodlesusa.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sandy_Riordan

Labradoodles and Goldendoodles, A new breed of dogs

Labradoodles and Goldendoodles, A new breed of dogs

by Ruth Bird

A fellow blogger was always mentioning “puggles” to me. Then one day I went for a walk with my 3 dogs and my neighbour and her dog. She mentioned the labradoodles and goldendoodles to me. She had seen them on a t.v. show.

So, I decided to do some investigating. For those who want some information about these dogs, but not long scientific reports, here is my article. I went on a long internet journey, and I found out some amazing facts.

At first I though someone was maybe just getting bored, and decided to create a new breed of dog. But no, there are some very valid reasons for breeding these mixtures. Just read on, and you may find that there are reasons why you may want to look into one of these “oodle” dogs yourself.

As always, do lots of research and get lots of recommendations from current “oodle” owners. There are also forums and clubs that you can find on the internet. These can also help you decide if one of these is for you.

In the meantime, just enjoy learning something new, and when your neighbour tells you about an “oodle” dog, then you will know what they are talking about.

A Labradoodle is a crossbred dog created by crossing the Labrador Retriever and the Poodle. Their temperament makes them good service and family dogs.

The impetus behind experiments with this type of cross was the desire to achieve a service dog that would not shed and so produce a hypoallergenic dog that is suitable for people with allergies to fur and dander. This has not yet been reliably achieved, as Labradoodles have varying coat lengths and textures, and crosses beyond the first generation do not yield a predictable coat type.

The result of this cross produced intelligent, easily trainable puppies that were the beginning of the Labradoodle as we now know it. Crossing these two breeds also gave the Labradoodle a hybrid vigor and a variety of coat types.

Labradoodles combine the best of the 2 breeds.

Labradoodles are known to posses the gentle, sweet disposition of the retrievers combined with the intelligence and allergy friendly coats of the poodles. Labradoodles are wonderful with children and people who have special needs. They are non-aggressive, highly intelligent dogs that are extremely easy to train. They want nothing more than to please their people.

The Labradoodle can vary in size: Standard, Medium and Miniature

Color varies from chalk (milky white), shades of cream, gold, black, chocolate, red, caramel and silver.

Coat: Labradoodles usually have no body odor, require minimal bathing and brushing and rarely, if ever, attract fleas. They seldom shed hair but will need to be groomed.

Wooly: Somewhat like a poodle. Requires regular grooming and is allergy friendly.

Fleece: The ultimate coat. It is easily maintained, non shedding, allergy and asthma friendly.

Hair: Anything from flat and straight to curls down the back and possibly wavy. It can vary from minimally to profusely shedding. Not likely to be allergy friendly.

Allergy and Asthma sufferers – Labradoodles may be the breed for you! Check it out…

The Labradoodle is still under development. Strictly speaking, the labradoodle cannot yet be described as a dog breed because it does not breed true. Further, the breed standards of breeds-under-development are invariably freer, more open to interpretation and cover more observable types than those of established or kennel club-recognized breeds.

The term Goldendoodle (Golden Doodle) describes a hybrid dog, crossbred between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle. This hybrid is often said to have begun in Australia, along with the Labradoodle;

US fanciers challenge this assertion. Poodle hybrids have become increasingly popular and it is likely that the combination of Golden Retriever and Poodle has been duplicated by breeders in various countries.

Goldendoodles are intelligent and obedient. The make great family pets and will be wonderful companions. They are vey social and devoted to family members. They are people dogs, good with kids and other dogs and pets, and friendly with strangers.

Goldendoodles are likely to get into mischief if they spend most of their lives alone or bored. (My golden retriever certainly gets in trouble when bored. I can vouch for that first hand.) They are intelligent and love to please, therefore, they are very easy to train. They are a medium to large size family dog with great temperaments.

When bred correctly, most of your first hybrid crosses are much healthier because they are NOT in-bred or line-bred or back-bred to their cousins, fathers, mothers, sisters and brothers. The Goldendoodle can work out well for those who suffer from allergies. They shed little to none, and they are very loving dogs. If you have allergy or dog hair concerns, look into a goldendoodle.

There are some amazing Labradoodle and Goldendoodle sites on the internet, with references to breeders in USA and Canada, and World Wide. These sites have some beautiful pictures of dogs and puppies. You will fall in love with them. I did instantly. That is why I posted about these dogs on my blog. And that is why I was so compelled to write about them.

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About the Author

My name is Ruth Bird. I have been married for 27 years to my husband, Chris. Chris has been battling the monster, MS, for a number of years. Pet Health Care is my passion. My pet blog is: http://mypetplace.blogspot.com/

Source: Article Search Engine: GoArticles.com

The Miniature Schnauzer

The Miniature Schnauzer

by Sidy Boy

Sam and Simon The Miniature Schnauzer is derived from the Standard Schnauzer and is said to have come from mixing Affenpinchers and Poodles with small Standards. The Mini’s were exhibited as a distinct breed as early as 1899, and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1926.

Miniature Schnauzers should be no less than 12 inches in height, and no more than 14 inches. They are sturdily built, nearly square in proportion of body length to height with plenty of bone. The weight should range between 14 to 18 pounds depending on height.

Schnauzers may be several colors. Salt and Pepper is the most common, though blacks and black & Silvers are being seen in increasing numbers. Their “Show Coat” differs from their “Pet Coat.” The show coat is a thick wiry coat, which is obtained through stripping the dog-pulling the hair out with a stripping knife. The pet coat is a much softer clipped coat. The breed has a soft undercoat, and if the dog is clipped, in time only the undercoat will remain. Pet owners are not recommended to try for a show coat on their dogs-not only is it very expensive to have done ($150+ each time), but it may be very difficult to find a groomer who is knowledgeable enough about the breed to do it. Having your pet clipped is best, and this should be done on a regular basis. The grooming schedule for a Miniature Schnauzer is normally every 4 to 8 weeks, depending on their hair growth. They will need to be combed and brushed in between full groomings to help prevent matting of their furnishings, and especially their beards. Just brushing the dog is not enough- they must be combed as well or their long furnishings will matt.

Miniature Schnauzers are hardy, healthy, intelligent, and fond of children. They were developed as a small farm dog, used as ratters. Their small size has permitted them to adapt easy to city living, though they still do quite well in the country, and can cover a large amount of ground with little tiring. They make wonderful family companions, and are extremely easy to train. They do well not only in conformation events, but also in obedience and agility.

Health concerns in the breed include Urolithiasis which is bladder stones. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) which is a degenerative disease of the retinal visual cells which leads to blindness. Cataracts which is Lens opacity that may in part or in total affect one or both eyes. Blindness results when cataracts are complete and in both eyes.

Panosteitis which is a developmental problem associated with too rapid growth. Lameness can occur in one limb or over time in all limbs. Typically the dog will stand with one leg up- a day or so later the dog will hold another leg up. The pain associated with Pano will often switch legs several times. Treatment usually involves resting and sometimes an arthritis type pain medication for a few days. This is not life threatening nor will it affect the dog throughout it’s lifetime.

Other concerns are immune dysfunction’s, heart problems and diabetes. For a full list and description of Miniature Schnauzer health concerns, please click here.

A reputable breeder will screen for inherited health problems and will be able to discuss if there has been any problems in their lines.

NOTICE: Despite what you may see on some websites, the only Miniature Schnauzers recognized by the AKC are blacks, salt and pepper and black and silvers. White Schnauzers (as well as the 3 AKC permitted colors) are recognized by the FCI. As with all breeds, please screen breeders carefully to assure you are getting a healthy, well balanced dog. There are many breeders out there only looking to make some money and will fool you into believing that their dogs are of the proper type. We have personally seen some “badly bred” Schnauzers that barely resemble the breed at all, and you must realize that when they lack one quality, they will most likely lack others- and health and temperament are extremely important qualities! Quality is important- proper structure, health and temperament. I’ve personally seen many illbred dogs who were loaded with health problems, and were noisy, and biters, so please be careful!

Taken From:

http://www.sidyboysfoolin.com/MiniSch.html

__________
The Wonderful World of Sidy Boy
www.sidyboysfoolin.com

Worried About Which Breed of Dog is Best for Your Family? Find Some Answers Here

Worried About Which Breed of Dog is Best for Your Family? Find Some Answers Here

By Niall Kennedy

Ask ten experts how many breeds of dogs exist and you will get ten different answers. However, many estimate there are more than 300 breeds of dogs. Each is valued by someone or by a group of people. In fact, they exist because they were bred to have characteristics that make them well suited for specific tasks. Over thousands of years, dogs were bred to meet a variety of human needs.

Chihuahuas, Pekinese and Shih-Tzus are generally known as toy breeds – very small types of dogs, often weighing less than ten pounds. The dogs were bred to be mainly companions rather than perform physical labor. These dogs were the basis of the phrase “lap” dogs as they were easily held in their owners’ laps.

Dogs in the Hound group come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, and were all originally bred to assist with hunting. Many hound types have an amazing sense of smell; others are best known for their stamina during the chase.

German shepards, Doberman pinchers, Rottweilers, Mastiffs, Giant Schnauzers and Boxers are just a few of the better known types of working dogs.

Working dogs have the size and strength that makes them well suited to guarding property and other intense physical tasks. They are well known for their extremely high intelligence and protective nature to their human companions.

Like the Hounds, dogs from the Sporting group were bred to assist with hunting. Alert and active by nature, sporting dogs fit in well with active owners. If you plan on adding any type of sporting dog to your family, keep in mind that these high-energy dogs need frequent exercise.

The dog breeds included in the Non-Sporting group vary greatly in appearance and abilities. Dalmatians, with their vast amount of stamina and energy, were set to run alongside carriages to guard the travelers inside. Later, firemen employed these unique dogs to guard fire wagons. Dalmatians are playful and loyal, and need human companionship.

Poodles were originally bred as work animals. These dogs are highly intelligent and one of the most trainable breeds. Some poodles are good guard dogs and some can be trained as hunters.

Terriers are known for their distinctive personalities. Bred to hunt vermin, terriers are instinctive, active diggers. Tenacious by nature, these lively dogs require owners willing to provide lots of physical and mental stimulation.

Sight hounds were bred to assist the hunter by virtue of their excellent eyesight. Instead of finding prey by scent, these lean hunters spot their quarry from a great distance. They have amazing stamina and energy and all members of this group need plenty of exercise.

Hopefully this information will help you to decide what breed of dog is right for bringing into your family. Whichever breed you decide on you need to remember that your dog will rely on you for everything from food and water, to shelter and exercise. In return for this you can expect lifelong devotion and love from your new best friend.

Best Pet Health Information is a resource which will help you find infomation, hints and tips to keep your dog happy and healthy. http://www.best-pet-health.info Copyright © Best-Pet-Health.info. All rights reserved. This article may be reprinted in full so long as the resource box and the live links are included intact.

Article Source: Niall Kennedy

Poodle Complete Profile

Poodle Complete Profile

by Dooziedog.com
Poodle

Image Details:

Key Facts:

Size: There are three sizes: standard, miniature and toy
Height: Standard – Over 38 cm (15 in) Miniature – 28-38 cm (11-15 in)
Toy – Under 28 cm (11 in)
Weight: Standard – 22 kg (49 lb) Miniature – 12 kg (26 lb)
Toy – 7 kg (15 lb)
Life Span: 16 years
Grooming: Demanding
Exercise: Medium
Feeding: Straightforward
Temperament: Sparky & cheerful
Country of Origin: France
AKC Group: Toy & Non-Sporting
Other Names: Caniche, Barbone

Physical Characteristics:

General Appearance: Elegant, finely chiselled and proud.
Colour: Black, silver, blue, white or cream with black pigmentation. Or brown and liver and matching pigmentation.
Coat: Frizzy, dense, fine, woolly and harsh in texture. The coat can be clipped to suit different tastes.
Tail: Set high, commonly docked and carried away from the body at a slight angle.
Ears: Set low, long, wide and hanging close to the head. Covered in long, wavy hair.
Body: The body is longer than the height and the shoulders are muscular and sloping. The back is short and slightly hollowed behind the withers. The ribs should be rounded with a deep chest. The loin is muscular and broad and the croup is rounded.

Temperament:
Even-tempered, fun-loving, lively and intelligent. Poodles are easily trained and quickly learn to perform tricks. They bond closely to their family and can be acutely sensitive to their owners mood. This breed is trouble-free in terms of getting along with other dogs, pets, strangers and children. They make delightful companions with their intelligence and adaptability. This breed should not be kept in a yard alone as they thrive on companionship and attention and their natural spirit can be destroyed if deprived of this.

Grooming:
Poodles that are being shown need to be clipped according to the breed style, which takes considerable skill and knowledge and is usually best left to a professional groomer. Poodles that are kept as pets are commonly trimmed short, leaving the hair longer on the head, the ears and legs. If these dogs are left untrimmed the harsh-textured coats will grow vastly in length. The teeth need to be checked for tartar and the ears should be kept clean. The advantage of these dogs is that they don’t shed hair. The coat on a Poodle can be washed quite often.

Exercise:
Poodles live happily in flats or small apartments as they don’t demand a great deal of exercise. They still need some exercise outside of the home such as walks to the park. These dogs generally excel in obedience classes.

History:
Poodles are believed to have originated from the old Spanish water dogs. They got their name from the German word ‘pudeln’ which means to splash in the water. This breed were excellent retrievers of injured water birds and ducks. A smaller variety was produced later which became the forerunner of the Miniature version we know today. Hunters shaved off most of the hair on the hindquarters to help these dogs perform better in water. They left the hair on the chest and front parts of the body for warmth and sections of hair on the leg joints for protection against injury. The custom of tying a bright ribbon on the topknot, was for identification of their dogs when at work retrieving. These customs have been maintained over the years for Poodles being shown today.

Additional Comments:

Poodles are regarded as one of the most difficult breed-standard patterns to achieve (if not the most difficult).
This breed is commonly recommended for people who are allergic to dog hair or dust as the Poodle does not shed any hair.
The Poodle is known for it’s intelligence and can be taught a variety of skills from water-retrieving to circus tricks. They appear to enjoy performing with the praise and laughter that it brings.
Different clips for Poodles include: lamb clip, lion clip, puppy clip and continental clip. The puppy clip is always popular for those owners who aren’t showing their dogs.

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This article provided courtesy of http://www.dooziedog.com/dog_breeds/poodle/